Teachers

St George School Investigates the Mystery of the Alewives

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Guest blog post by Alison England, middle school science teacher from St. George School in Tenants Harbor.
With help from the Vital Signs Freshwater Mini-grant, St George School students are following leads in our community mystery of why alewives are not returning to our marsh following several years of restocking and the brief "appearance" of a small group of alewives coming into our marsh two years ago.

Loranger Memorial School 6th grade Science Investigation- Is the Goosefare Brook a healthy ecosystem?

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Guest blog post by Laura Seaver-Maley, Loranger Memorial School, Old Orchard Beach

Our investigation revolved around the question, “Is Goosefare Brook a healthy ecosystem?”

Fall 2017 Field Season in Review


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The Fall 2017 field season was a season of diving deeper for the Vital Signs Community. Citizen scientists from all across the state and into NH gathered and shared meaningful, environmental data.

Round 2 - Vital Signs Freshwater Investigation Mini-Grant

We rely on our ponds, lakes, rivers, and streams for drinking water, recreation, and economic opportunities. With 5,700 water bodies and countless waterways, Maine’s freshwater resource managers need Maine students to be citizen scientists in their local freshwater ecosystems, and to help raise awareness in their communities. Freshwater investigations can be challenging - special equipment may be required and field sites may not be accessible from the school campus.

Regional Middle School Teacher Communities with Vital Signs

The Vital Signs Team is working with middle school educators from across the state who are excited about bringing more authentic science investigations into their classrooms. These regional teacher communities (RTCs) are focused on building community in rural teacher communities, enhancing teacher practice, and increasing student interest and success in science.

2017 Vital Signs Freshwater Investigation Mini-Grant

We rely on our ponds, lakes, rivers, and streams for drinking water, recreation, and economic opportunities. With 5,700 water bodies and countless waterways, Maine’s freshwater resource managers need Maine students to be citizen scientists in their local freshwater ecosystems, and to help raise awareness in their communities. Freshwater investigations can be challenging - special equipment may be required and field sites may not be accessible from the school campus.

Vital Signs goes Downeast

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On Friday April 28th, at the University of Maine in Machias, 12 classroom educators, 1 employee from the Department of Marine Resources, and 1 educator from the Downeast Institute, joined together for the Washington County STEM Improvement Institute with Vital Signs; a full day of work around dealing with data in the context of an authentic investigation. Teachers represented grades 5-12 and the towns of Machias, Perry, Pembroke, Harrington, Jonesport, and Beals.

Hot Topic! New England Cottontail

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Many of you may be familiar with the New England Cottontail from a past Hot Topic! we posted here a little over a year ago now. Didn't see that post? Check it out HERE.

Fall 2016 Field Season

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On this snowy day in February, we thought it would be a great chance to reflect on the amazing Fall 2016 field season that the Vital Signs Community had. This was an exciting fall, with new community members from all across the state and into NH participating and gathering data!

Deer Isle Students Reopen School Nature Trail

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Guest blog post by: Mickie Flores, Deer Isle Stonington Elementary School

The seventh and eighth graders at Deer Isle Stonington Elementary School took science out of the classroom this Fall, collecting and analyzing data on the school's old nature trail, and now the students are ready to reopen the trail to the public this upcoming spring. Everyone has been hard at work identifying native species and learning about the relationships between the living and nonliving components of the site as they cleared the trail, which now extends from the elementary school playground toward the high school.

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