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species-botrylloides-violaceus-was-not-found-samsos-2015-07-10 samsos Hurricane Island 2015-07-10 14:48:00 Orange sheath tunicate Botrylloides violaceus I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/samsos/image_5.jpg sites/default/files/samsos/image_8.jpg Hurricane Island Dock sites/default/files/species_photos/110.jpg sites/default/files/samsos/image_7.jpg Looking at the settling plates we did not find any organisms that resembled the Orange shealth tunicates. We did not find any orange organisms nor did we find any colonies of orange tunicates. At the hurricane island dock, the settling plates were covered in barnacles and amphipods when we took them out of the water. We didn't find any tunicates however.
species-hemigrapsus-sanguineus-was-found-jtidal-2015-07-03 jtidal Steuben 2015-07-03 20:30:00 Asian shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/jtidal/petit_manan.jpg sites/default/files/jtidal/quadrat.jpg Petit Manan sites/default/files/species_photos/106.jpg sites/default/files/jtidal/0005.jpg This is the first H. sanguineus that we found, a small male. sites/default/files/jtidal/0007.jpg This is another H. sanguineus male sites/default/files/jtidal/0003.jpg Female H. sanguineus carrying eggs Found one Asian shore crab in the high intertidal zone by flipping over rocks--subsequent searching revealed a total of 5, but with low densities
species-hemigrapsus-sanguineus-was-not-found-nataliesos-2015-07-03 nataliesos Pemaquid 2015-07-03 14:54:00 Asian shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/nataliesos/image_7.jpg sites/default/files/nataliesos/image_10.jpg Pemaquid Point sites/default/files/species_photos/106.jpg sites/default/files/nataliesos/image_11.jpg We did several 20 meter transects and did not find any Asian shore crabs. We looked carefully under all the rocks and found other crabs but no Asian shore crabs.
species-carcinus-maenas-was-found-nataliesos-2015-07-03 nataliesos Pemaquid 2015-07-03 14:54:00 Green crab Carcinus maenas I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/nataliesos/image_7.jpg sites/default/files/nataliesos/image_8.jpg Pemaquid Point sites/default/files/species_photos/107.jpg sites/default/files/nataliesos/image_9.jpg We performed a transact and found a lot of green crabs under rocks.
species-codium-fragile-was-found-nataliesos-2015-07-03 nataliesos Pemaquid 2015-07-03 14:54:00 Green fleece Codium fragile I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/nataliesos/image_7.jpg sites/default/files/nataliesos/image_12.jpg Pemaquid Point sites/default/files/species_photos/100.jpg sites/default/files/nataliesos/image_6.jpg Green algae found attached to rocks.
species-didemnum-vexillum-was-found-clairegordy-2015-07-03 Clairegordy Pemiquid 2015-07-03 11:47:00 Ascidian Didemnum vexillum I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/clairegordy/image_0.jpg sites/default/files/clairegordy/image_8.jpg Pemiquid Point sites/default/files/species_photos/didemnum.jpg sites/default/files/clairegordy/image_9.jpg When we flipped rocks we found multiple types of tunicates. One of the types was white or off white and matched the formation that didemnum normally formed. We then verified our id with our supervisor We performed a transect through a tide pool in the rocky inter tidal
species-botrylloides-violaceus-was-found-clairegordy-2015-07-03 Clairegordy Pemiquid 2015-07-03 11:47:00 Orange sheath tunicate Botrylloides violaceus I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/clairegordy/image_0.jpg sites/default/files/clairegordy/image_2.jpg Pemiquid Point sites/default/files/species_photos/110.jpg sites/default/files/clairegordy/image_3.jpg While flipping rocks we found many colonies of orange tunicates which matched the description of orange sheath tunicates. We then had our supervisor verify our results We performed a transect through a tide pool in the rocky inter tidal
species-botryllus-schlosseri-was-not-found-clairegordy-2015-07-03 Clairegordy Pemiquid 2015-07-03 11:47:00 Star tunicate Botryllus schlosseri I think I did not find it invasive sites/default/files/clairegordy/image_0.jpg sites/default/files/clairegordy/image_10.jpg Pemiquid Point sites/default/files/species_photos/111.jpg sites/default/files/clairegordy/image_11.jpg While doing our transect we encounter multiple types of tunicates. However we did not find any that had the coloring patterning or shapes of star tunicates. We flipped all rocks in out squares and examined all surfaces We performed a transect through a tide pool in the rocky inter tidal
species-rosa-rugosa-was-found-finalcut9-2015-07-02 finalcut9 Winterville Plantation 2015-07-02 19:55:00 Beach rose Rosa rugosa I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/finalcut9/img_5681.jpg sites/default/files/finalcut9/img_5698.jpg Winterville Plantation, Maine sites/default/files/species_photos/200.jpg sites/default/files/finalcut9/img_5697.jpg The flowers were bright pink. The stems had a lot of thorns as shown at the lower right side of the flower in the picture. sites/default/files/finalcut9/img_5696.jpg The leaves were compound-pinnate and toothed at the edges. The leaves also had small hairs. The invasive plants that I discovered were on a developed part of Red River road. No invasive plants were found beyond Frosty Hill road on the southern end of red river road. The Beach Rose was found next to people's houses. The plant looked like it was deliberately planted. Most of the goutweed was along the pavement in front of people's houses. Lupine was also along the roadside of route 11 in Aroostook County from Ashland to Winterville Plantation.
species-aegopodium-podagraria-was-found-finalcut9-2015-07-02 finalcut9 Winterville Plantation 2015-07-02 19:55:00 Goutweed Aegopodium podagraria I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/finalcut9/img_5681.jpg sites/default/files/finalcut9/img_5634.jpg Winterville Plantation, Maine sites/default/files/species_photos/234.jpg sites/default/files/finalcut9/img_5636.jpg The stem is round and grooved. Little tiny stems branch off in a circle from the main stem. Flowers are at the top of these tiny stems. sites/default/files/finalcut9/img_5674.jpg The leaves were bluish green and had white stripes around them. The invasive plants that I discovered were on a developed part of Red River road. No invasive plants were found beyond Frosty Hill road on the southern end of red river road. The Beach Rose was found next to people's houses. The plant looked like it was deliberately planted. Most of the goutweed was along the pavement in front of people's houses. Lupine was also along the roadside of route 11 in Aroostook County from Ashland to Winterville Plantation.
species-lupinus-polyphyllus-was-found-finalcut9-2015-07-02 finalcut9 Winterville Plantation 2015-07-02 19:55:00 Lupine Lupinus polyphyllus I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/finalcut9/img_5681.jpg sites/default/files/finalcut9/img_5678.jpg Winterville Plantation, Maine sites/default/files/species_photos/213.jpg sites/default/files/finalcut9/img_5633.jpg The leaf type of this species was compound palmate because they were arranged in a circle. The leaves were also smooth. sites/default/files/finalcut9/img_5631.jpg The flowers were at the top portion of the plant. They were not hairy. The invasive plants that I discovered were on a developed part of Red River road. No invasive plants were found beyond Frosty Hill road on the southern end of red river road. The Beach Rose was found next to people's houses. The plant looked like it was deliberately planted. Most of the goutweed was along the pavement in front of people's houses. Lupine was also along the roadside of route 11 in Aroostook County from Ashland to Winterville Plantation.
species-cipangopaludina-chinensis-malleatus-was-found-vitalsleuth-2015-06-27 vitalsleuth China 2015-06-27 19:48:00 Chinese mystery snail Cipangopaludina chinensis malleatus I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/vitalsleuth/img_0880.jpg sites/default/files/vitalsleuth/img_0824.jpg camp dock sites/default/files/species_photos/024.jpg sites/default/files/vitalsleuth/img_0825.jpg 7 year-old kid hands for scale. We think this photo shows the rounded operculum and pointy spire best. The whorls are distinct. sites/default/files/vitalsleuth/img_0854.jpg Here are 7 empties that floated by us. There were many more. sites/default/files/vitalsleuth/img_0835.jpg A shell on a mission. We were not intending to do any science today. ...but science had other plans for us. There were so many large snails floating along that we just couldn't ignore them. We think we saw lots on the bottom of the lake as well, but we didn't submerge to get a good look (chilly water + intimidated by big gastropods = wimps). We captured the native aquatic plants and dragonfly nymph case while we had our camera out.
species-anisoptera-infraorder-was-found-vitalsleuth-2015-06-27 vitalsleuth China 2015-06-27 19:48:00 Dragonfly nymph Anisoptera (infraorder) I think I found it Native sites/default/files/vitalsleuth/img_0880.jpg sites/default/files/vitalsleuth/img_0824_1.jpg camp dock sites/default/files/species_photos/535_1.jpg sites/default/files/vitalsleuth/img_0881.jpg We think this is a dragonfly nymph case because it has tiny wing pads (see other photo for a better look) on its back, six legs near its head, and it has fierce-looking mandibles. Chomp. sites/default/files/vitalsleuth/img_0884.jpg Sun bathing with us. We noticed lots of adult dragonflies buzzing around, think we found the former owner of this case, and made up thrilling life story for him/her. We were not intending to do any science today. ...but science had other plans for us. There were so many large snails floating along that we just couldn't ignore them. We think we saw lots on the bottom of the lake as well, but we didn't submerge to get a good look (chilly water + intimidated by big gastropods = wimps). We captured the native aquatic plants and dragonfly nymph case while we had our camera out.
species-hydrilla-verticillata-was-not-found-vitalsleuth-2015-06-27 vitalsleuth China 2015-06-27 19:48:00 Hydrilla Hydrilla verticillata I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/vitalsleuth/img_0880.jpg sites/default/files/vitalsleuth/img_0824_0.jpg camp dock sites/default/files/species_photos/004.jpg sites/default/files/vitalsleuth/img_0831.jpg Happy to report that we did not find hydrilla again this year. This photo shows that this is NOT hydrilla because it has whorls of three leaves. Hydrilla has 4 or more leaves per whorl. sites/default/files/vitalsleuth/img_0832.jpg We were not intending to do any science today. ...but science had other plans for us. There were so many large snails floating along that we just couldn't ignore them. We think we saw lots on the bottom of the lake as well, but we didn't submerge to get a good look (chilly water + intimidated by big gastropods = wimps). We captured the native aquatic plants and dragonfly nymph case while we had our camera out.
species-carcinus-maenas-was-found-samsos-2015-06-27 samsos Cape Elizabeth 2015-06-27 17:10:00 Green crab Carcinus maenas I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/samsos/image_9.jpg sites/default/files/samsos/image_10.jpg Kettle Cove sites/default/files/species_photos/107.jpg sites/default/files/samsos/image_11.jpg We found about 5 per quadrant, sometimes less, sometimes more Many green crabs and Asian shore crabs. More green crabs though
species-botrylloides-violaceus-was-found-seaotter24-2015-06-26 Seaotter24 South Portland 2015-06-26 14:16:00 Orange sheath tunicate Botrylloides violaceus I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/seaotter24/image.jpg sites/default/files/seaotter24/image_3.jpg Port Harbor Marine sites/default/files/species_photos/110.jpg sites/default/files/seaotter24/image_0.jpg In the picture is the Tunicate. It is orange and looking closer at the Tunicate there are zooids. We only found small batches of these Tunicate. I could not find any lobes on the colonies and the Tunicate felt rigid. . Having rained this morning and last night the harbor was very cool and damp. We arrived at the harbor around 8:30 this morning. The air temperature felt cool and damp. We pulled plates from the right side of dock. These plates have been in the water since May 5. The plates were clean. We then walked around the dock and reached under the dock to find the Orange Shealth Tunicates. The tunicates we did find were orange in color. Looking closer at the tunicates each had the zooids which is consistent with the Orange Sheakth Tunicate. although we did not find any that were connected together nor did they have lobes.
species-botrylloides-violaceus-was-found-clairegordy-2015-06-26 Clairegordy Portland 2015-06-26 14:11:00 Orange sheath tunicate Botrylloides violaceus I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/clairegordy/image_7.jpg sites/default/files/clairegordy/image_6.jpg Fort Hardor Marim sites/default/files/species_photos/110.jpg sites/default/files/clairegordy/image_4.jpg Orange tunicate covering sites/default/files/clairegordy/image_5.jpg Same tunicate as on mussel The sky was dark and cloudy. It had recently rained. We were on the dock and pulled up plates. Then we looked over the side of the dock. There were large numbers of mussels and ke. We pulled up a number of mussels and on the shells there were orange tunicates covering them. We examined them and showed them to our supervisor who confirmed our conclusion. We then pulled up keel and found more.
species-botrylloides-violaceus-was-found-hockey1-2015-06-26 Hockey1 South Portland 2015-06-26 14:09:00 Orange sheath tunicate Botrylloides violaceus I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/hockey1/image.jpg sites/default/files/hockey1/image_0.jpg Port harbor marine sites/default/files/species_photos/110.jpg sites/default/files/hockey1/image_1.jpg We found this Orange sheath turnicate on a muscle under the dock sites/default/files/hockey1/image_2.jpg Our plates were lacking of orgamizams sites/default/files/hockey1/image_3.jpg More turnicates Having previously rained the night before, the harbor was quite and the water was calm. We arrived at 8:30 and pulled up the plates from the dock. The plates were white, and lacking of orgamizams, invasive or other. We concluded that this was because the plates had only been in the water since early May. Curious to see if the dock held truncates we peered under the docks and found orange sheath turnicate smothering some local muscles.
species-styela-clava-was-not-found-samsos-2015-06-26 samsos Portland 2015-06-26 13:04:00 Asian tunicate Styela clava I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/samsos/image.jpg sites/default/files/samsos/image_1.jpg Portland Harbor sites/default/files/species_photos/112_0.jpg sites/default/files/samsos/image_2.jpg However they fit with the yellow-brown color, the tunicates we found were not styela clava because the upper half didn't have bumps as styela clava do. sites/default/files/samsos/image_3.jpg Although this has a yellow color, it didn't have other organisms growing on It and longitudinal ridges on the bottom as styela clava do. sites/default/files/samsos/image_4.jpg We didn't find any styela clava on our tiles as seen in this photo here. Tunicates found under the dock at portland harbor. One is a light orange and one is a darker one. We didn't find club tunicates.
species-celastrus-orbiculatus-was-found-nanolmstead-2015-06-25 nanolmstead portland 2015-06-25 18:40:00 Asian bittersweet Celastrus orbiculatus I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/nanolmstead/image.jpg sites/default/files/nanolmstead/image_0.jpg Gmri yard sites/default/files/species_photos/208.jpg sites/default/files/nanolmstead/image_1.jpg Is sprawling over fence and wrapping around traps. sites/default/files/nanolmstead/image_2.jpg Berries al over stem, are still green. sites/default/files/nanolmstead/image_3.jpg Leaf shape looks like leaf on id sheet, not tapering at both ends like the native bittersweet We are happy because we are outside. We ran into a few challenges such as not finding many flowers this time of year and we had to be careful not to trip on crab pots.
species-styela-clava-was-not-found-brooke16-2015-06-25 Brooke16 Portland 2015-06-25 18:00:00 Club tunicate Styela clava I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/brooke16/image.jpg sites/default/files/brooke16/image_1.jpg Lucky catch dock sites/default/files/species_photos/112_0.jpg sites/default/files/brooke16/image_2.jpg I don't think I found it because the shapes are different and the color is not the same. Also on my information sheet for club tunicate, it said they are often found in dense communities, and as you can see these species on my settling plate are not very dense. sites/default/files/brooke16/image_3.jpg Back to the color thing, club tunicate is an orange brown ish color, and the ones growing on the plate are more brown and Orange ish Our program leader placed settling plates into the water in early May, approximately May 5th. We went down to the dock and looked around. All around us the water seemed kinda gross and scummy. A lot of dust and pollen or poulution on the surface of the water. There was some sea weed also floating around. The rope that the settling plates was attached to had changed in color. We sampled the water and tested clarity and salinity around the dock.
species-botrylloides-violaceus-was-found-brooke16-2015-06-25 Brooke16 South Portland 2015-06-25 05:00:00 Orange sheath tunicate Botrylloides violaceus I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/brooke16/image-1.jpg sites/default/files/brooke16/image-3.jpg Lucky Catch Dock sites/default/files/species_photos/110.jpg sites/default/files/brooke16/image-6.jpg We found multiple types of tunicates, but the more prominent one was orange. sites/default/files/brooke16/image-8_0.jpg The color matches sites/default/files/brooke16/image-7.jpg We had a series of settling plates along the right side of the dock, majority of the plates had little to nothing on them, mostly just little tiny hydroids, and then there was just that one plate that was filled with everything. Hydroids, tunicates, styela clava, and sediment. There were muscles along the wood underneath the dock that had a lot of orange sheath tunicate.
species-berberis-thunbergii-was-found-barbarousbarberrybandits-2015-06-18 Barbarousbarberrybandits Cape Elizabeth 2015-06-18 18:40:00 Japanese barberry Berberis thunbergii I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/barbarousbarberrybandits/image.jpg sites/default/files/barbarousbarberrybandits/image_1.jpg Robinson woods sites/default/files/species_photos/202.jpg sites/default/files/barbarousbarberrybandits/image_2.jpg The leaves were oval in shape and smooth sites/default/files/barbarousbarberrybandits/image_3.jpg The leaves averaged a little more than 2cm sites/default/files/barbarousbarberrybandits/image_4.jpg The was one thorn at the base of every cluster of leaves The leaves averaged slightly more than 2cm The leaves were oval shaped and smooth There were thorns at the base of each cluster of leaves
species-berberis-thunbergii-was-found-rmitchell-2015-06-18 rmitchell Cape Elizabeth 2015-06-18 18:39:00 Japanese barberry Berberis thunbergii I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/rmitchell/image.jpg sites/default/files/rmitchell/image_3.jpg Robinson Woods sites/default/files/species_photos/202.jpg sites/default/files/rmitchell/image_0.jpg Smooth simple leaves, berries are developing, on spine per joint sites/default/files/rmitchell/image_1.jpg sites/default/files/rmitchell/image_2.jpg On slope, many erratic, beneath pines
species-adelges-tsugae-was-found-jchawarski-2015-06-18 JChawarski Cape elizabeth 2015-06-18 17:39:00 Hemlock wooly adelgid Adelges tsugae I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/jchawarski/image.jpg sites/default/files/jchawarski/image_3.jpg Robinson woods sites/default/files/species_photos/214.jpg sites/default/files/jchawarski/image_1.jpg See field notes sites/default/files/jchawarski/image_2.jpg Apologies - we are interns learning about the program so in our general discussions we left out some proper photos opportunities. Anyway, we found two Eastern Hemlock trees about 7 ft tall. On the bottom branches of one tree I found 2 examples of what I believe to be Woody Adelgid, on the underside of the needles. During our search we found 2 species that are often confused for the woody Adelgid and the specimen in question was definitely different ie. Not wet and bubbly or protected by a spider. This small nest pictured had a woolly, dry and waxy texture. When pulled apart I observed a reddish orange color which I believed to be eggs in their early stage. In 15 minutes of searching only three small <1mm nests were found between 2 trees.
species-porphyra-umbilicalis-was-found-redriotsbe-2015-06-11 RedRiotsBE South Portland 2015-06-11 14:45:00 Laver Porphyra umbilicalis I think I found it Native sites/default/files/redriotsbe/5nk2uunmuex07qsvtewifu9urt77z1bnloqjm-jtl6o8cadgp-_qn06c0z06gunblvnpaww937-h409.jpg sites/default/files/redriotsbe/cgu51_sc7sizl7n5phiddc4vjx2pobimkmhlag6ln2akirsqhljnmmuzdruh2eyhbgfkhaw937-h409.jpg SMCC Dock sites/default/files/species_photos/laver_plant.jpg sites/default/files/redriotsbe/_l1fxj8zd2oac8aead3rujxyzswf4zo9yl-azem9vm8r8snnl1scbc9agtmsgllknob54qw937-h409.jpg This seaweed is Porphyra umbilicalis. Porphyra umbilicalis is a red seaweed that appears deep reddish brown to pale. This specimen is deep red-brown but appears pale when spread out in water. The specimen was found on a floating dock. The specimen was also found on a dock with water that is frequently turned by storm and boat waves. All these features match up with the features of Porphyra umbilicalis. sites/default/files/redriotsbe/oblzt7cxibi7aewajajgeqotat0cdlvu6snub4do9s2slyzse6_b64rcfza11iglkeyrdaw937-h409.jpg Porphyra umbilicalis can reproduce vegetatively. In the photo you can see individual structures that could be the reproductive cells separating from the old seaweed. These individuals match the cells in the Species ID card exactly. The structure have a yellowish hue and have two by two cell groups per individual. If these cells are the vegetative cells of the seaweed, that would mean that this seaweed is reproducing. sites/default/files/redriotsbe/wcutqewknwksnl6nmigl22fujxwvsikonxh2jkuj6e1ol9eoj4ziphwt5fcyxlfodaxm1ww937-h409.jpg We know this species is Porphyra umbilicalis because of its cells color and structure. The cells shape are circular. This quickly rules out other red species like heterosiphonia, and polysiphonia. Also, we know this species is a red because its cells are very distinctly red. We went out on 6/11/15 to the SMCC docks. We went to look for marine invasive species. Our mission was to find out if climate change affects when marine algae reproduce in Maine. The weather was mostly clear and sunny.
species-palmaria-palmata-was-found-redriotsjf-2015-06-11 RedRiotsJF South Portland 2015-06-11 14:45:00 Dulse Palmaria palmata I think I found it Native sites/default/files/redriotsjf/p1000293.jpg sites/default/files/redriotsjf/p1000291.jpg SMCC Dock sites/default/files/species_photos/dulse_plantsq.jpg sites/default/files/redriotsjf/p1000307.jpg One piece of evidence is that the specimen I found was clearly not paper-thin like the Porphyra. The specimen I found was thick, and could quite easily cause a cut like that of a knife blade. Thickness is important, because it fits perfectly the leathery, thick texture of the algae I observed, this is important because this means the algae does not fit Porphyra’s description at all. sites/default/files/redriotsjf/red_seaweeds_2_june_2015_002.jpg Another reason this algae is likely Palmeria palmata, is that the structures towards the end, called fronds, are finger-like, and quite large. This differs from algae like Laver, which have very thin, streamer-like fronds. This shows a clear characteristic that sets the specimen apart from other seaweed in the area. sites/default/files/redriotsjf/red_seaweeds_june_2015_023.jpg The last piece of evidence would be the fact this seaweed reproduces sexually. Though I am not sure, it seems the specimen is female, due to its lack of patches where spermatia are released . Although the seaweed seems to have already reproduced (due to what seem to be exhausted patches of spores), this sets it aside from Laver, because Laver reproduces asexually rather than sexually like Palmeria palmata. The time was just around 11:00, after getting on the bus from South Portland High School we arrived at the sampling site (SMCC dock) to begin our mission. The first mission we were assigned was the identification and observation of 13 invasive species. The next was to determine whether our seaweed samples were Palmeria palmata, Porfyra umbilicalis, or Alaria esculenta. The day was warm and a little windy, and the dock was brimming with life around its perimeter. There were many types of red and brown seaweeds attached to the dock, and on them were other types of organisms, small arthropods, most likely. What other kinds of organisms could be there that the class hadn’t observed that day?
species-porphyra-umbilicalis-was-found-redriotstb-2015-06-11 RedRiotsTB South Portland 2015-06-11 14:45:00 Laver Porphyra umbilicalis I think I found it Native sites/default/files/redriotstb/p1000293.jpg sites/default/files/redriotstb/p1000291.jpg SMCC Dock sites/default/files/species_photos/laver_plant.jpg sites/default/files/redriotstb/red_seaweeds_june_2015_011.jpg This is a picture of the red algae under the microscope. We think this species is Porphyra because it produces neutral spores at the margin of the blade of algae. This specimen closely resembles the pictures found of the Porphyra while its neutral spores are being released during asexual reproduction. Looking at this sample and its release of two-by- two-celled neutral spores, which will replicate into a new Porphyra. Because Porphyra is asextual, reproduction will produce exact copies of the original species. I think these are neutral spores because they are smaller and yellowish rather than larger and reddish brown. sites/default/files/redriotstb/red_seaweeds_june_2015_004.jpg We can tell that this is not a sample of Heterosiphonia nor of Polysiphonia, two other common red seaweeds. Heterosiphonia and Polysiphonia’s cells are rectangular and in neat rows. While this sample is more globular and not neatly formed. Also because this sample is clearly red we can also draw the connection between this specimen and Porphyra, which is also red. It is important to note this specimen’s color and shape because that’s one of the most distinguishing features of identifying Porphyra. sites/default/files/redriotstb/red_seaweeds_june_2015_007.jpg For Porphyra the algae may appear to looks as though the margin of the blade is damaged or chewed by amphipods. The sample we took looks that way. You can see the tears and rip in the side of the blade, looking as though it has been chewed. Also since this specimen's coloring is redish brown closely resembles the color of Porphyra. Furthermore as you can see the sample is tissue paper thin therefore we can assume this is a sample of Porphyra which has this same quality. Though you can’t tell the size of the of this specimen, you can tell enough by the features that this species would be the species Porphyra. We went to the SMCC docks on June 11th, 2015 at around 11:00 a.m. to figure out whether climate change was affecting when marine algae reproductive in Maine. We observed specimens by pulling up ropes to see the species attached. Furthermore we observed the sides of the docks, picking up seaweed samples and inspecting the area for algae. Later after bringing the samples to the lab we inspected the species under a microscope to determine whether or not our species was reproducing.
species-palmaria-palmata-was-found-redriotssm-2015-06-11 RedRiotsSM South Portland 2015-06-11 14:45:00 Dulse Palmaria palmata I think I found it Native sites/default/files/redriotssm/bjcs8u4ve389t0ylrdwmbzobxydowkpq54srvouff0okcczw9vqrgx_ftsep849rtwpfvqw937-h360.jpg sites/default/files/redriotssm/mzxxoy7r37zpf6osnwsis0etwhj8v80yyi0rnlqcjobn_xxetuxw4kazbaptyarac524iww937-h360.jpg SMCC Dock sites/default/files/species_photos/dulse_plantsq.jpg sites/default/files/redriotssm/fugulbfjgoawe0u1ldg-dts2llfci7btc-65w3uetgvep7iuare95yrqpkfyqilzat8q0ww690-h260.jpg The seaweed I found shared common characteristics with Palmaria palmata. The seaweeds is a reddish brown with finger-like fronds. The blades of the seaweed also have a leathery texture. This distinguishes it as Palmaria palmata rather than another red seaweed like Heterosiphonia which is filamentous and has irregular branching that decreases towards the tip. sites/default/files/redriotssm/78jxw-njbpwfe9rlzgmwslwwlcesiyuqjprsulm9-z6nacr0axnrbbu3ayng_89p8yx-paw690-h260.jpg When observing the cell structure of the seaweed it is quite different than that of Heterosiphonia. The cells are circular and small. They spread across the blade in no particular order. This differs from Heterosiphonia, whose cells have a rectangular shape with a uniform number in each row. sites/default/files/redriotssm/d_takcabvvixsekayvopycllr3jgrzaujush4cbhvwzotawymph8qu7aghks784f-kkawqw690-h260.jpg I believe that I have found a female at the tetraporophyte reproductive state. Along the blades there are dark and light patches with dark patches on the outside and light towards the middle. There is also a distinguished spotted pattern towards the tip. I think it is a female because males are a much lighter color with spotted patterns throughout the blade. We visited our site, the SMCC dock, at around 10:45AM. The weather was mostly clear, warm and quite windy. The reason for visiting the dock was to analyze and observe the possible increase or decrease in invasive species for the MIMIC study. We also were observing to see if climate change is effecting the rate of reproduction in red seaweeds.
species-palmaria-palmata-was-found-redriotscg-2015-06-11 RedRiotsCG South Portland 2015-06-11 14:45:00 Dulse Palmaria palmata I think I found it Native sites/default/files/redriotscg/site.jpg sites/default/files/redriotscg/butts.jpg SMCC Dock sites/default/files/species_photos/dulse_plantsq.jpg sites/default/files/redriotscg/far.jpg The seaweed matches the physical description of Palmaria palmata provided. The specimen was red, flat with “finger-like fronds,” and the blades had dark mottled patches. The other common red seaweed is Porphyra. This seaweed could not be Porphyra because it was too thick. Porphyra is tissue-paper thin, whereas this seaweed was leathery. sites/default/files/redriotscg/close.jpg Looking more closely, the branches of the seaweed looked very dotted and mottled. This matches the description of a reproducing Palmaria, because the reproduction cells are present towards the tip of the branches, forming different colors in a mixed pattern. The seaweed was a female because females have dark patches and are a darker color, whereas males are more pale with light spots. sites/default/files/redriotscg/micro.jpg On a microscopic level, the reproductive cells can be seen clearly, forming both dark and light cells that create the spots visible on the seaweed branches. This could not have been Porphyra because the cells are not split. On the microscopic level, Porphyra has uniformly colored cells that look split through the middle by a cell wall, rather than cells that are differently colored. We went to the dock by Spring Point Marina to look for reproducing Palmaria palmata. We went at 10:45am on a sunny but very windy day. It was warm and slightly cloudy.
species-pinus-resinosa-was-not-found-group-1-2015-06-09 Group 1 Harrington 2015-06-09 14:25:00 red pine Pinus resinosa I think I did not find it Native sites/default/files/group_1/11414724_966591036694872_666308285_n.jpg sites/default/files/group_1/11264357_966591030028206_284772449_n.jpg Rails to Trails sites/default/files/species_photos/red_pine_bark.jpg sites/default/files/group_1/11418358_966591070028202_518169660_n.jpg The bark on a Red Pine has a more scaly look to it. White Pine has long cracks down through the bark as shown in the evidence in the picture. sites/default/files/group_1/11297820_966591010028208_1622872748_n.jpg The needles are supposed to be between 12-18 centimeters long. The needles as shown in the picture are shorter than 12cm. sites/default/files/group_1/11292760_966591026694873_160521935_n.jpg Red pine has small cones that are 4-6 centimeters long at the end of the branch. As shown in the picture there are no cones on the branch. The class was able to go for a walk and look for Red Pine and what we ended up finding was White Pine. It was a warm cloudy day and no birds were squawking. The only animals we could hear were the frogs. Flies and mosquitoes could be heard buzzing around your head. The class walked down the Sunrise ATV Trails.
species-fallopia-japonica-was-found-group-2-2015-06-09 Group 2 Harrington 2015-06-09 14:25:00 Japanese knotweed Fallopia japonica I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/group_2/11418370_856600971041586_855285951_n.jpg sites/default/files/group_2/11418370_856600971041586_855285951_n_0.jpg Rails to Trails sites/default/files/species_photos/210.jpg sites/default/files/group_2/img_2143.jpg When we measured the leaves we found they were 11 1/2 centimeters long and 10 centimeters wide. The average leaf is 18 centimeters long and 12 centimeters wide. Also, the leaves are spade shaped with a leafy tip and smoothed edges. sites/default/files/group_2/11292798_856600011041682_14275933_n.jpg This photo shows a student who is 5'8" standing next to the bush. In this, you can tell that the bush is tall and very wide. You can vaguely see the branches coming out of the zig-zag on the stems. sites/default/files/group_2/11419866_856600004375016_964705136_n.jpg In this picture you can see how the stems grown in a zig-zag formation. You can also see the branches coming out of the stems. This is one why you can tell that is a Japanese knotweed. My Human ecology class got to go outside and look for Japanese Knotweed. It was a hot and sunny day. It was the perfect day to get out of the class room and be outside. It was a little buggy out but, not too bad. We walked on the side of the rode where we found the Japanese Knotweed. It was a little noisy with some cars driving by here and there but not too bad. When we found the Japanese Knotweed it was only a little ways in but you could see it from the road. When we found this we measured it and examined it to make sure it was the Japanese Knotweed.