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species-carcinus-maenas-was-not-found-muddy-2015-04-24 muddy Woolwich 2015-04-24 15:35:00 Green crab Carcinus maenas I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/moss_boss/img_10751.jpg sites/default/files/muddy/img_10741.jpg Dewick Farm sites/default/files/species_photos/107.jpg sites/default/files/moss_boss/img_10731.jpg We did not find any species of crab.
species-carcinus-maenas-was-not-found-lucyh-2015-04-24 LucyH Woolwich, ME 2015-04-24 14:37:00 Green crab Carcinus maenas I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/lucyh/image.jpg sites/default/files/lucyh/image_1.jpg DeWick Farm sites/default/files/species_photos/107.jpg sites/default/files/lucyh/image_0.jpg Thorough physical investigation by sorting through rock weed. Found amphripods but no crabs.
species-tsuga-canadensis-was-found-christinev-2015-04-24 christinev Woolwich 2015-04-24 14:00:00 Eastern hemlock Tsuga canadensis I think I found it Native sites/default/files/christinev/img_1414.jpg sites/default/files/christinev/img_1414_0.jpg Dewick Farm sites/default/files/species_photos/703.jpg sites/default/files/christinev/img_1411.jpg You can see that there are 2 white racing stripes and a peg stem attaching it to the branch. These are some of the ways that I can tell this is eastern hemlock.
species-carcinus-maenas-was-not-found-steweast1-2015-04-24 Steweast1 Woolwich 2015-04-24 13:40:00 Green crab Carcinus maenas I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/steweast1/img_0674.jpg sites/default/files/steweast1/img_0677.jpg LoKeennebec Estuary sites/default/files/species_photos/107.jpg sites/default/files/steweast1/img_0677_0.jpg No crabs of any kind were found sites/default/files/steweast1/img_0674_0.jpg We did not find the invasive species
species-pinus-resinosa-was-found-44bl11s-2015-04-13 44bl11s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 red pine Pinus resinosa I think I found it Native sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_19.jpg sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_22.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/red_pine_bark.jpg sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_25.jpg In this picture, you can clearly see small hints of red among the patches of grayish-reddish colours. This tree also has red pine-like breaks along the bark of the tree. This is one of the most notable thing while identifying a red pine, so we most certainly believe it is so. sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_26.jpg The diameter of the tree was about two feet. This diameter is highly suggestive of it being a red pine tree. As you can see in the photo, the tree is over 2 feet wide. Compared, to the similar pitch pine, which has a diameter of 1-2 feet, it is much larger, making it more likely to be a red pine. sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_20.jpg This final picture can easily prove that this tree is a red pine tree. As you can see, the tree is very tall, which is exactly what a red pine tree is supposed to be. A pitch pine tree is also very tall like this. However, a pitch pine tree is only 30-40 feet, while a red pine tree stands at an amazing 60-80 feet. Since we could barely see the top of this tree when we got this underview of this tree, we will assume that this tree is 60-80 feet, just like a red pine tree. We can now assume that this tree is certainly a red pine tree. On April 14, 2015, the students of Massabesic Middle School observed the trees on their campus. These trees included; red pine, pitch pine, northern red oak and white oak, American beech, and Eastern Hemlock. They were looking for red pine for traces of the infamous red pine scale, and for traces of the insect hemlock wooly adelgid, both of these being harmful to their corresponding trees. The students observed the oak and beech species because they were interested in the marcesence trait of the trees, a special trait of the tree that allows it to keep its leaves over winter, while also losing some. A Deciduous/Coniferous Tree mixture. These students are very dedicated to the finding of these trees because in the month of November, they worked very hard to inform the public about these invasive insects, and how they could help to keep their trees healthy.
species-tsuga-canadensis-was-found-44am12s-2015-04-13 44am12s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Eastern hemlock Tsuga canadensis I think I found it Native sites/default/files/44am12s/image.jpg sites/default/files/44am12s/image_16.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/703.jpg sites/default/files/44am12s/image_13.jpg Needles are flat and dark green. sites/default/files/44am12s/image_14.jpg The cones are the right size shape and color. sites/default/files/44am12s/image_15.jpg We think we have found HWA because we saw white under the needles. And the tree(s) are dying. The purpose of this trip outside is to ID trees on campus. We are looking for Red Pine and Hemlock because invasive bugs might be on our trees. We are looking for Red Oak and Beech because they are easist to identify in the winter. We are also looking to get parents and friends out Sid ego look for these plants over April brake.
species-fagus-grandifolia-was-found-44am12s-2015-04-13 44am12s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 American beech Fagus grandifolia I think I found it Native sites/default/files/44am12s/image.jpg sites/default/files/44am12s/image_9.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/american_beech.jpg sites/default/files/44am12s/image_10.jpg The leaves are the right shape and the right pale yellow color. sites/default/files/44am12s/image_11.jpg The bark is smoth and a pale gray color. sites/default/files/44am12s/image_12.jpg The leaves are dead, but still hanging onto the branch. The purpose of this trip outside is to ID trees on campus. We are looking for Red Pine and Hemlock because invasive bugs might be on our trees. We are looking for Red Oak and Beech because they are easist to identify in the winter. We are also looking to get parents and friends out Sid ego look for these plants over April brake.
species-quercus-rubra-was-found-44am12s-2015-04-13 44am12s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Red oak Quercus rubra I think I found it native sites/default/files/44am12s/image.jpg sites/default/files/44am12s/image_8.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/707.jpg sites/default/files/44am12s/image_5.jpg The leaf is dead, but still hanging on to the branch. The dead leaf is also the right size shape and color. sites/default/files/44am12s/image_6.jpg The acorn head is the right size and color. sites/default/files/44am12s/image_7.jpg The bark is the right pattern and color. The purpose of this trip outside is to ID trees on campus. We are looking for Red Pine and Hemlock because invasive bugs might be on our trees. We are looking for Red Oak and Beech because they are easist to identify in the winter. We are also looking to get parents and friends out Sid ego look for these plants over April brake.
species-pinus-resinosa-was-found-64vs57s-2015-04-13 64vs57s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 red pine Pinus resinosa I think I found it Native sites/default/files/64vs57s/image_14.jpg sites/default/files/64vs57s/image_15.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/red_pine_bark.jpg sites/default/files/64vs57s/image_21.jpg The needles were in clusters of two. sites/default/files/64vs57s/image_17.jpg The bark was reddish-brown. sites/default/files/64vs57s/image_22.jpg The tree was very straight, and very tall. Purpose: ID trees on campus -we went looking around 1:00pm -looking for Red Pine/ Hemlock -ID Oak/ Beech this time of year - Plan to get parents/ friends outside over April Vacation to ID Red Pine/ Pitch Pine/ Hemlock to look for RPS (red pine scale) or HWA (hemlock wooly adelgid).
species-pinus-rigida-was-found-74sb62s-2015-04-13 74sb62s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Pitch Pine Pinus rigida I think I found it Native sites/default/files/74sb62s/image_0.jpg sites/default/files/74sb62s/image_9.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/pitch_pine.jpg sites/default/files/74sb62s/image_4.jpg The cones are small and stubby, I felt them and they were rough, they are 2 inches long sites/default/files/74sb62s/image_7.jpg The needles are 3 per bunch, green, and They are 6-13 inches long. sites/default/files/74sb62s/image_8.jpg The bark was rough and gray, it was easy to tear off The day was sunny, around 60 degrees, most of the snow was gone. The ground was muddy and wet. We found Pitch Pine, it had three needles per bunch. The bark was gray and rough, it was also easy to tear off the bark. The cones were egg shaped and grey, they were also rough. This weekend we are planing to take people outside , i will take my dad outside and show him how to do Vital Signs
species-pinus-rigida-was-found-74hp76s-2015-04-13 74hp76s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Pitch Pine Pinus rigida I think I found it Native sites/default/files/74hp76s/image_20.jpg sites/default/files/74hp76s/image_21.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/pitch_pine.jpg sites/default/files/74hp76s/image_23.jpg Bark looks rough and spiney. sites/default/files/74hp76s/image_22.jpg Needles are in clusters of three. sites/default/files/74hp76s/image_25.jpg And are 6-13 centimeters in length. We went out on our campus to look for Pitch Pine, on April 14, 2015 around/about the time of 10:00-10:50 in the morning. We actually went outside to look for Red Pine and Hemlock, so we may check for invasive species such as Hemlock Wooly Adelgid and Red Pine Scale. We identified Pitch Pine trees also, because they may be confused as Red Pine, and we wanted to mark them to avoid mistaking them for Red Pine.
species-tsuga-canadensis-was-found-44kl10s-2015-04-13 44kl10s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Eastern hemlock Tsuga canadensis I think I found it Native sites/default/files/44kl10s/image_10.jpg sites/default/files/44kl10s/image_20.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/703.jpg sites/default/files/44kl10s/image_29.jpg The leaves on the hemlock were suctioned on the the branch. This is also a distinguishing feature on the hemlock. sites/default/files/44kl10s/image_28.jpg We know this tree is hemlock because of the distinguishing characteristic of the "racer stripes" on the underside of the branch. sites/default/files/44kl10s/image_21.jpg It was Tsuga or commonly called Easetern Hemlock because the bark was grayish and scaly. . Our class is looking to identify trees on campus. The trees we really want to find have the invasive insects HWA and RPS. Red pine and hemlock are the two main trees we want to find. Our classes plan is to get parents and friends outside over April vacation to identify trees. We also signed in parents and students to vital signs during our invasive species forum. Also identifying oak and beech because they are easy to identify this time of year because old dead leaves are still hanging on to the branches.
species-adelges-tsugae-was-not-found-44kl10s-2015-04-13 44kl10s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Hemlock wooly adelgid Adelges tsugae I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/44kl10s/image_10.jpg sites/default/files/44kl10s/image_25.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/214.jpg sites/default/files/44kl10s/image_26.jpg There were no white tuffs on the underside of the branches. This would be a sign that HWA is on this trees branches. sites/default/files/44kl10s/image_27.jpg This tree is living very well. It isn't dead because if it was it would be a deadest brown color. . Our class is looking to identify trees on campus. The trees we really want to find have the invasive insects HWA and RPS. Red pine and hemlock are the two main trees we want to find. Our classes plan is to get parents and friends outside over April vacation to identify trees. We also signed in parents and students to vital signs during our invasive species forum. Also identifying oak and beech because they are easy to identify this time of year because old dead leaves are still hanging on to the branches.
species-tsuga-canadensis-was-found-44bl11s-2015-04-13 44bl11s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Eastern hemlock Tsuga canadensis I think I found it Native sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_19.jpg sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_27.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/703.jpg sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_28.jpg Our first piece of evidence suggests that this tree is hemlock because of its bark. As you can see, the color of this bark is reddish-gray, just like hemlock, and the bark looks just like hemlock, so we can see that this bark is possibly a hemlock tree's bark. sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_29.jpg This next picture shows that a sample of this tree's needles measures up to about 1/3 of an inch. Coincidentally, a hemlock's trees are supposed to have 1/3 to 2/3 inch needles, which means this suggests once again that this tree is hemlock. sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_38.jpg If you look closely at this photo, you can see the suction-cup like connection of the leaves to the stem of the Hemlock. Due to this specific feature, we are able to easily determine and confirm that this debris is from that of a Eastern Hemlock. On April 14, 2015, the students of Massabesic Middle School observed the trees on their campus. These trees included; red pine, pitch pine, northern red oak and white oak, American beech, and Eastern Hemlock. They were looking for red pine for traces of the infamous red pine scale, and for traces of the insect hemlock wooly adelgid, both of these being harmful to their corresponding trees. The students observed the oak and beech species because they were interested in the marcesence trait of the trees, a special trait of the tree that allows it to keep its leaves over winter, while also losing some. A Deciduous/Coniferous Tree mixture. These students are very dedicated to the finding of these trees because in the month of November, they worked very hard to inform the public about these invasive insects, and how they could help to keep their trees healthy.
species-adelges-tsugae-was-not-found-44bl11s-2015-04-13 44bl11s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Hemlock wooly adelgid Adelges tsugae I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_19.jpg sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_32.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/214.jpg sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_33.jpg This small branch piece was collected from the same Eastern Hemlock that was previously mentioned. The entire branch was thoroughly examined and there was no evidence of small white formations, or any hint of deformation. This tree was perfectly healthy, and it is believed there is no invasion by the Hemlock Wooly Adelgid. sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_34.jpg This is a shot of the same Hemlock tree's bark. As you can see, there are no visible damages to the bark or any signs that lead us to think that Hemlock Woolly Adelgid is present, and because of this, we can conclude that Hemlock Woolly Adelgid is not present on the bark, or in the tree. On April 14, 2015, the students of Massabesic Middle School observed the trees on their campus. These trees included; red pine, pitch pine, northern red oak and white oak, American beech, and Eastern Hemlock. They were looking for red pine for traces of the infamous red pine scale, and for traces of the insect hemlock wooly adelgid, both of these being harmful to their corresponding trees. The students observed the oak and beech species because they were interested in the marcesence trait of the trees, a special trait of the tree that allows it to keep its leaves over winter, while also losing some. A Deciduous/Coniferous Tree mixture. These students are very dedicated to the finding of these trees because in the month of November, they worked very hard to inform the public about these invasive insects, and how they could help to keep their trees healthy.
species-fagus-grandifolia-was-found-44bl11s-2015-04-13 44bl11s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 American beech Fagus grandifolia I think I found it Native sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_19.jpg sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_30.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/american_beech.jpg sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_31.jpg This piece of evidence can show you the bark of the tree we studied, and as you can see, the bark is very similar to that of an average American beech tree. This can lead us to believe that this tree may be an American beech tree! On April 14, 2015, the students of Massabesic Middle School observed the trees on their campus. These trees included; red pine, pitch pine, northern red oak and white oak, American beech, and Eastern Hemlock. They were looking for red pine for traces of the infamous red pine scale, and for traces of the insect hemlock wooly adelgid, both of these being harmful to their corresponding trees. The students observed the oak and beech species because they were interested in the marcesence trait of the trees, a special trait of the tree that allows it to keep its leaves over winter, while also losing some. A Deciduous/Coniferous Tree mixture. These students are very dedicated to the finding of these trees because in the month of November, they worked very hard to inform the public about these invasive insects, and how they could help to keep their trees healthy.
species-quercus-rubra-was-found-44kt16s-2015-04-13 44kt16s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Red oak Quercus rubra I think I found it native sites/default/files/44kt16s/image_0.jpg sites/default/files/44kt16s/image_1.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/707.jpg sites/default/files/44kt16s/image_2.jpg We know we found northern red oak because it's bark is a dark grey. It's leaves are six inches long and very pointy. The leaves were still on the branches though they were dead. Therefore they were brown. The wood was hard and heavy. It was a thin, small tree. We found northern red oak. We know we found red oak because the bark was dark grey. We also know that it is an northern red oak because the leaves were six inches long and were pointy. The leaves were also staying on the branches. The wood was strong and very heavy. It was a very thin and tiny tree.
species-matsucoccus-matsumurae-was-not-found-44bl11s-2015-04-13 44bl11s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Red pine scale Matsucoccus matsumurae I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_19.jpg sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_35.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/rps_ref.jpg sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_36.jpg This is a straight-up sample shot of the Red Pine tree. As you can see, we can just look at the tree and already tell that Red Pine Scale is not present, because the tree looks perfectly healthy, and if Red Pine Scale actually infected the Red Pine tree, the tree would look much less healthy. sites/default/files/44bl11s/image_37.jpg This is a photo of a red pine tree's bark, and as you can see, there are no deformations in the bark. If there were unhealthy marks or hints, it would look much worse and discolored. On April 14, 2015, the students of Massabesic Middle School observed the trees on their campus. These trees included; red pine, pitch pine, northern red oak and white oak, American beech, and Eastern Hemlock. They were looking for red pine for traces of the infamous red pine scale, and for traces of the insect hemlock wooly adelgid, both of these being harmful to their corresponding trees. The students observed the oak and beech species because they were interested in the marcesence trait of the trees, a special trait of the tree that allows it to keep its leaves over winter, while also losing some. A Deciduous/Coniferous Tree mixture. These students are very dedicated to the finding of these trees because in the month of November, they worked very hard to inform the public about these invasive insects, and how they could help to keep their trees healthy.
species-tsuga-canadensis-was-found-64lk46s-2015-04-13 64lk46s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Eastern hemlock Tsuga canadensis I think I found it Native sites/default/files/64lk46s/image_8.jpg sites/default/files/64lk46s/image_10.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/703.jpg sites/default/files/64lk46s/image_11.jpg I believe I did find hemlock because there was real evidence of it, by the racing stripes and the short needles. sites/default/files/64lk46s/image_12.jpg I believe that I did find hemlock because there was flakey bark. sites/default/files/64lk46s/image_13.jpg I believe there is hemlock because the tree was small needles and they have white racing stripes on the back of the needles. We went out on Monday, April 13th. It was warm, about somewhere in the 60's, and there was a little breeze, and kind of humid. Our group found Red Pine and hemlock. Our class was looking for extra trees to study and to get evidence on. Also we're trying to get new people looking for invasive species. We're going to try to get new people on Vital Signs over vacation.
species-pinus-resinosa-was-found-64lk46s-2015-04-13 64lk46s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 red pine Pinus resinosa I think I found it Native sites/default/files/64lk46s/image_8.jpg sites/default/files/64lk46s/image_17.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/red_pine_bark.jpg sites/default/files/64lk46s/image_18.jpg I belive I found red pine because of the long needles. I couldn't get a clear picture because of how tall the tree was. sites/default/files/64lk46s/image_19.jpg The tree was really tall because how they are used as telephone poles. sites/default/files/64lk46s/image_20.jpg I could tell by how the bark was smooth and flakey. We went out on Monday, April 13th. It was warm, about somewhere in the 60's, and there was a little breeze, and kind of humid. Our group found Red Pine and hemlock. Our class was looking for extra trees to study and to get evidence on. Also we're trying to get new people looking for invasive species. We're going to try to get new people on Vital Signs over vacation.
species-tsuga-canadensis-was-found-44dt15s-2015-04-13 44dt15s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Eastern hemlock Tsuga canadensis I think I found it Native sites/default/files/44dt15s/image_7.jpg sites/default/files/44dt15s/image_6.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/703.jpg sites/default/files/44dt15s/image_3.jpg The needles are flat and curved at the end. sites/default/files/44dt15s/image_4.jpg The cones are the right size and color. There are three cones. The first cone is a light gray color. The second cone is a light brown. The third is a dark brown and closed. sites/default/files/44dt15s/image_5.jpg It is harder to tell with the bark because the tree is dying, but it seems to be the right color and texture. The purpose for going outside was to find red pine/hemlock and check for invasive species on the trees. We also want to get parents/friends outside To look for these species. We are also looking for oak and beech because it is easier to identify in the winter.
species-adelges-tsugae-was-not-found-44dt15s-2015-04-13 44dt15s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Hemlock wooly adelgid Adelges tsugae I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/44dt15s/image_7.jpg sites/default/files/44dt15s/image_9.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/214.jpg sites/default/files/44dt15s/image_8.jpg We are concerned because this tree is dying. At first we thought that this white was the hemlock wooly adelgid, but later found that it was just a cobweb. We think that since this tree and others around it are dying because the salt from the road is spraying and killing the trees. The purpose for going outside was to find red pine/hemlock and check for invasive species on the trees. We also want to get parents/friends outside To look for these species. We are also looking for oak and beech because it is easier to identify in the winter.
species-quercus-alba-was-found-54dg26s-2015-04-13 54dg26s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 White oak Quercus alba I think I found it native sites/default/files/54dg26s/image_0.jpg sites/default/files/54dg26s/image_10.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/706.jpg sites/default/files/54dg26s/image_9.jpg The leaves were 3 to 3 1/2 inches long they were a yellowish orange color, the trees also still have the leave attached. sites/default/files/54dg26s/image_11.jpg The branches had at least 10 leaves on them and there was other trees that made the oak blend in sites/default/files/54dg26s/image_12.jpg The branches had pieces falling off and the bark was a grey color with white spots and it was very smooth My class went out on the 13th of April to try find four trees, hemlock tree, white oak, pitch pine an red maple. My group ended up finding White oak and Pitch pine. My class keeps going outside and finding information on invasive species, my class is also trying to influence people to go outside and search for invasive species an but the information on Vital Signs.
species-pinus-rigida-was-found-74la60s-2015-04-13 74la60s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Pitch Pine Pinus rigida I think I found it Native sites/default/files/74la60s/image_17.jpg sites/default/files/74la60s/image_18.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/pitch_pine.jpg sites/default/files/74la60s/image_19.jpg The bark seems to be what we were thought sites/default/files/74la60s/image_21.jpg Three needles per part sites/default/files/74la60s/image_20.jpg The branches were pointyish
species-tsuga-canadensis-was-found-14newkid83s-2015-04-13 14newkid83s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Eastern hemlock Tsuga canadensis I think I found it Native sites/default/files/14newkid83s/image.jpg sites/default/files/14newkid83s/image_1.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/703.jpg sites/default/files/14newkid83s/image_2.jpg As you can see on our needles we had "racing stripes." At this point we discovered that the needles were attatched to the branches by little stems, so that elimenates the chance of the tree being balsam fir. We did however notice that some needles were yellow/orange dispite the fact that eastern hemlock is an evergreen tree we were conserned that we might have found hemock woolly adelgid. We looked around the tree, and even checked the crown, everything looked pretty healthy and decided that it was just a natural occrance. sites/default/files/14newkid83s/image_6.jpg We also found 1 inch cones less than a foot away, and I was able to identify it as an eastern hemlock cone. sites/default/files/14newkid83s/image_7.jpg The bark was also ridged as well as a dark grey. We know that we found eastern hemlock for many reasons. One being that the bark was a dark grey. Another piece of valid information is that the needles were connected to the branches by little stems, and they had racing stripes on the bottom of the needle.
species-adelges-tsugae-was-not-found-14newkid83s-2015-04-13 14newkid83s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Hemlock wooly adelgid Adelges tsugae I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/14newkid83s/image.jpg sites/default/files/14newkid83s/image_9.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/214.jpg sites/default/files/14newkid83s/image_4.jpg Despite the yellow and orange needles we know we had not found hemlock woolly adelgid because when we looked around the rest of the tree was fairly healthy. We know that we found eastern hemlock for many reasons. One being that the bark was a dark grey. Another piece of valid information is that the needles were connected to the branches by little stems, and they had racing stripes on the bottom of the needle.
species-pinus-rigida-was-found-54ad22s-2015-04-13 54ad22s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Pitch Pine Pinus rigida I think I found it Native sites/default/files/54ad22s/image_11.jpg sites/default/files/54ad22s/image_12.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/pitch_pine.jpg sites/default/files/54ad22s/image_13.jpg The bark has needle growing out of the trunk. Also is a grayish color. sites/default/files/54ad22s/image_14.jpg The needles come in clusters of three.and they are green. sites/default/files/54ad22s/image_15.jpg The branches curl together or twist. My class went outside on April 30th to try to find four different trees hemlock tree, white oak, red maple and pitch pine. When my group went out we ended up finding pitch pine. My class is trying to get as many people to go outside and search for invasive speices and put the information an Vial Signs.
species-fagus-grandifolia-was-found-64bs55s-2015-04-13 64bs55s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 American beech Fagus grandifolia I think I found it Native sites/default/files/64bs55s/image_21.jpg sites/default/files/64bs55s/image_28.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/american_beech.jpg sites/default/files/64bs55s/image_26.jpg The leaves were still on the trees, and we know it was beech because the leaves were more oval shaped than oak leaves. sites/default/files/64bs55s/image_27.jpg The bark of the beech tree was really smooth; very different than oak trees. Our main purpose was to identify trees on our campus. We were looking for red pine and hemlock because of the invasive species that could live in those trees. We also were looking for beech and oak to see how long they have stayed on during the winter. Our plan is to get our parents or relatives to sign up for vital signs and submit an entry on red pine, hemlock, oak, or beech.
species-tsuga-canadensis-was-found-64bs55s-2015-04-13 64bs55s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Eastern hemlock Tsuga canadensis I think I found it Native sites/default/files/64bs55s/image_21.jpg sites/default/files/64bs55s/image_31.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/703.jpg sites/default/files/64bs55s/image_24.jpg The needles are about 3/4 of an inch, and had two white racing stripes on the underside of the needle. sites/default/files/64bs55s/image_32.jpg The bark was rough and flaky, and was a brownish red color kind of like rust. sites/default/files/64bs55s/image_29.jpg The needles are connected to the branch with stems. This is the difference with between hemlock and balsam fir. ( HEMS HAVE STEMS AKA STEMLOCK) Our main purpose was to identify trees on our campus. We were looking for red pine and hemlock because of the invasive species that could live in those trees. We also were looking for beech and oak to see how long they have stayed on during the winter. Our plan is to get our parents or relatives to sign up for vital signs and submit an entry on red pine, hemlock, oak, or beech.
species-adelges-tsugae-was-not-found-64bs55s-2015-04-13 64bs55s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Hemlock wooly adelgid Adelges tsugae I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/64bs55s/image_21.jpg sites/default/files/64bs55s/image_30.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/214.jpg sites/default/files/64bs55s/image_34.jpg The branches on the trees did not have hemlock wooly adelged on them because the branches didnt have white stuff (hemlock wooly adelged) on the branches and needles Our main purpose was to identify trees on our campus. We were looking for red pine and hemlock because of the invasive species that could live in those trees. We also were looking for beech and oak to see how long they have stayed on during the winter. Our plan is to get our parents or relatives to sign up for vital signs and submit an entry on red pine, hemlock, oak, or beech.
species-pinus-resinosa-was-found-74ke65s-2015-04-13 74ke65s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 red pine Pinus resinosa I think I found it Native sites/default/files/74ke65s/image_7.jpg sites/default/files/74ke65s/image_8.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/red_pine_bark.jpg sites/default/files/74ke65s/image_9.jpg It was striaght tall and all the branches were at the top sites/default/files/74ke65s/image_12.jpg The bark was smooth and was plated . sites/default/files/74ke65s/image_11.jpg The pine cones were small and kind of spiked. Its tall straight its bark is smooth the pine cones are small its needles are long and are two per bunch.
species-tsuga-canadensis-was-found-44jf9s-2015-04-13 44jf9s E. Waterboro 2015-04-13 18:16:00 Eastern hemlock Tsuga canadensis I think I found it Native sites/default/files/44jf9s/image_11.jpg sites/default/files/44jf9s/image_15.jpg Massabesic Middle School Campus sites/default/files/species_photos/703.jpg sites/default/files/44jf9s/image_12.jpg This sample of our eastern hemlock tree shows that the needles on these trees have little white streaks under them, just like those of an eastern hemlock tree. This can convince us that this tree is an eastern hemlock tree. sites/default/files/44jf9s/image_13.jpg This is a sample photo of the same tree's bark. As we can see, this tree's bark has many distinct qualities that can make this eastern hemlock, including its slightly bluish bark color and the occasional moss patches like some hemlock trees have. sites/default/files/44jf9s/image_14.jpg This final photo is a sample shot of one of the needles of this tree placed against a ruler. As you can see, the needles are somewhere around 2/3 inches long, just like those of eastern hemlock trees. This is important, but the most important feature of this tree's sample is that the needles are branching out of stems. According to the phrase "hems have stems", this is one of the most significant ways that this could be a hemlock tree. On April 29, 2015, seventh grade students from Massabesic Middle School went outside to observe a site near the school. We did this because the spots they were observing were full of trees, which means their study site was a forest. They were studying in a forest because there were a lot of identifiable species in that forest, which they knew could contain some dangerous invasive species. They were concerned about these invasive species because they learned during an invasive species forum they held at November 6, 2015 that invasive species can weaken trees and even kill them. They also wanted to do this because they wanted to spread awareness on these nuisances and what they could cause.