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species-adelges-tsugae-was-not-found-teacherobrien-2014-10-20 teacherobrien Hampden Maine 2014-10-20 19:21:00 Hemlock wooly adelgid Adelges tsugae I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/teacherobrien/hemlock_top_side.jpg sites/default/files/teacherobrien/img_20141020_150535_970_1_copy.jpg Monroe Rd Hampden Maine sites/default/files/species_photos/214.jpg sites/default/files/teacherobrien/hemlock_top_side_0.jpg After close inspection of the needles and looking in the area for wool, we found nothing other than a small tree struggling for light. sites/default/files/teacherobrien/img_20141020_150535_970_1_copy_0.jpg The underside also showed no wool or signs of hymphs. A handlens was used to magnify the area but still no sign. sites/default/files/teacherobrien/img_20141020_150610_469_0.jpg This is the photo of the area with the small tree in the center. It is the only small hemlock in the area. All the large trees were much to tall to see (even with a ladder) The tall ones were at least 30 tall. The tree in this picture is about 4 feet tall. I set out to find hemlock trees on our property but only found several very very large trees that had no green growth that could be reached. These trees were mixed in with many red pines, some white pines, a few maples and a few oak trees. It seems that young trees couldn't grow with so many large trees around. Finally we found a small tree on the edge of an opening. We looked closely at all the needles, both on top and underneath. We also looked closely for tatters of wool or settled nymphs. There were no signs of little black "sesame seeds with a fringe of wax. I do know this is a bad time of year to find wooly adelgid and will observe again in the spring.
species-eriocheir-sinensis-was-not-found-mitten-2-2014-10-16 Mitten 2 Yarmouth 2014-10-16 15:15:00 Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/mitten_2/images-5.jpg sites/default/files/mitten_2/images-5_0.jpg Old Town Landing Yarmouth sites/default/files/species_photos/021.jpg sites/default/files/mitten_2/img_0303.jpg We did not find any Chinese Mitten Crabs because we found mostly Green Crabs which are another invasive species. They differ because while the Chinese Mitten Crabs has four spikes and the crabs we were finding had five. sites/default/files/mitten_2/img_0304.jpg Chinese Mitten Crabs have a white/brown underside while the crabs we founds were orange and yellow. - I am happy because we did not find any Chinese Mitten Crabs which can be harmful to the native crab species. - A problem we ran into is that we were confusing the crabs we were finding for Chinese Mitten Crabs when they were actually Green Crabs. - I hear very little because our surroundings are rather quiet. I see lots of seaweed. I smell the ocean and seaweed. - I am surprised that we didn't find the Chinese Mitten Crab because we did find Green Crabs which are also an invasive species.
species-colpomenia-peregrina-was-not-found-sea-potato-2-2014-10-16 Sea Potato 2 Yarmouth 2014-10-16 15:15:00 Sea potato Colpomenia peregrina I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/sea_potato_2/img_0249.jpg sites/default/files/sea_potato_2/img_0244.jpg Old Town Landing Yarmouth sites/default/files/species_photos/sea_potato.jpg sites/default/files/sea_potato_2/img_0243.jpg We thoroughly checked seaweed, under seaweed, marshy areas around seaweed, and checked the water for any possible floating sea potatoes and didn't find any evidence of the sea potato.
species-eriocheir-sinensis-was-not-found-mitten-1-2014-10-16 Mitten 1 Yarmouth 2014-10-16 15:15:00 Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/mitten_1/photo.jpg sites/default/files/mitten_1/img_8322_0.jpg Old Town Landing Yarmouth sites/default/files/species_photos/021.jpg sites/default/files/mitten_1/img_8322.jpg We found green crabs which were not the crabs that we were looking for. We were looking for the Mitten Crab. We were not able to find any mitten crabs; however, we did find six other green crabs in the area that we were looking. The area that we were looking was very rocky with lots of seaweed near the waters edge, and many tide-pools were present. There were not many crabs that were present in the area that we were looking.
species-heterosiphonia-japonica-was-not-found-algae-1-2014-10-16 Algae 1 Yarmouth 2014-10-16 15:15:00 Heterosiphonia Heterosiphonia japonica I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/algae_1/unnamed.jpg sites/default/files/algae_1/photo.jpg Old Town Landing Yarmouth sites/default/files/species_photos/117_heterosiphonia.jpg sites/default/files/algae_1/fullsizerender.jpg We did not find the red alga on this coast. There were other seaweeds and organisms, but no signs of the Asain red algae. Tidal pools were found that contained other red and green organisms that looked similar to the Asain red algae; however, none of the three specific types we were searching for were identified. Looked in the middle and lower tidal zones where these species were supposed to be found if there were any there. All we found that was anything close to the species that we were trying to find was seaweed. I am happy because we were outside and looking for organisms. I see a rocky ocean area engrossed with seaweed; I hear the waves, wind, and the birds flying overhead; I smell the mudflats, as it was low tide. I'm surprised that we didn't find the specific algae we were looking for in this particular area because I feel like I've seen these invasive and native algaes often in Maine.
species-porphyra-umbilicalis-was-found-algae-1-2014-10-16 Algae 1 Yarmouth 2014-10-16 15:15:00 Laver Porphyra umbilicalis I think I found it Native sites/default/files/algae_1/unnamed.jpg sites/default/files/algae_1/unnamed_2.jpg Old Town Landing Yarmouth sites/default/files/species_photos/laver_plant.jpg sites/default/files/algae_1/unnamed_1.jpg As the group was looking around in the mid intertidal and the high intertidal zones we found no evidence for of the Laver, All that was found was green algae around the rocks and the mud. The Laver algae is supposed to be green. The places that we found algae was around the lower intertidal zone. Which proved to be just green algae again. The Laver does not show up in the lower intertidal zone. As the group was looking around more, we found that the rocks near the mid and higher intertidal zones were just covered with barnacles and no algae. I am happy because we were outside and looking for organisms. I see a rocky ocean area engrossed with seaweed; I hear the waves, wind, and the birds flying overhead; I smell the mudflats, as it was low tide. I'm surprised that we didn't find the specific algae we were looking for in this particular area because I feel like I've seen these invasive and native algaes often in Maine.
species-styela-clava-was-not-found-sea-star-1-2014-10-16 Sea Star 1 Yarmouth 2014-10-16 15:15:00 Club tunicate Styela clava I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/sea_star_1/img_3161_copy.jpg sites/default/files/sea_star_1/img_3161_copy_2.jpg Old Town Landing Yarmouth sites/default/files/species_photos/112_0.jpg sites/default/files/sea_star_1/img_3155.jpg While looking for the northern sea star and the common sea star we also looked for the club tunicate, or leathery sea squirt, but we were unsuccessful in finding this either. I am happy because: We got to do a hands-on activity outside. We saw, heard, and smelled the: Ocean, sea weed, crabs, mud, periwinkles, hermit crabs. We were surprised because we did not see or find anything that we were looking for. Some questions and problems we had: Was this not the right habitat for sea stars? The biggest problem was that we did not find any sea stars.
species-asterias-forbesi-was-not-found-sea-star-1-2014-10-16 Sea Star 1 Yarmouth 2014-10-16 15:15:00 Common sea star Asterias forbesi I think I did not find it Native sites/default/files/sea_star_1/img_3161_copy.jpg sites/default/files/sea_star_1/img_3159_0.jpg Old Town Landing Yarmouth sites/default/files/species_photos/635.jpg sites/default/files/sea_star_1/img_3155-1.jpg While searching for the northern sea star we were also looking for the common sea star, but we were unsuccessful in finding either. I am happy because: We got to do a hands-on activity outside. We saw, heard, and smelled the: Ocean, sea weed, crabs, mud, periwinkles, hermit crabs. We were surprised because we did not see or find anything that we were looking for. Some questions and problems we had: Was this not the right habitat for sea stars? The biggest problem was that we did not find any sea stars.
species-asterias-rubens-was-not-found-sea-star-1-2014-10-16 Sea Star 1 Yarmouth 2014-10-16 15:15:00 Northern sea star Asterias rubens I think I did not find it Native sites/default/files/sea_star_1/img_3161_copy.jpg sites/default/files/sea_star_1/img_3159.jpg Old Town Landing Yarmouth sites/default/files/species_photos/northern_seastar.jpg sites/default/files/sea_star_1/img_3161_copy_1.jpg We started by looking in the intertidal pools, but we were informed that we were more likely to find the sea star in deep water. Therefore, we searched all along the lower tidal areas in many different areas that resembled the photo above. and were unable to find any evidence of sea stars living in this environment. I am happy because: We got to do a hands-on activity outside. We saw, heard, and smelled the: Ocean, sea weed, crabs, mud, periwinkles, hermit crabs. We were surprised because we did not see or find anything that we were looking for. Some questions and problems we had: Was this not the right habitat for sea stars? The biggest problem was that we did not find any sea stars.
species-heterosiphonia-japonica-was-not-found-algae-2-2014-10-16 Algae 2 Yarmouth 2014-10-16 15:15:00 Heterosiphonia Heterosiphonia japonica I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/algae_2/photo_1.jpg sites/default/files/algae_2/photo_3.jpg Old Town Landing Yarmouth sites/default/files/species_photos/117_heterosiphonia.jpg sites/default/files/algae_2/photo_1_0.jpg We found Knotted Wrack, and Bladder Wrack, but we did not see the Asian Red Algae, or Heterosiphonia. sites/default/files/algae_2/photo_2.jpg This is an example of the native species "Bladder Wrack" -We did not find any examples of invasive Algae. -We found the Bladder Wrack, or Rockweed, algae as well the Knotted Wrack algae. - Due to the similarity in characteristics, it is often difficult to differentiate between invasive and native algae. - The Knotted Wrack algae was very prevalent at the investigation scene. - Algae covered most of of the rocks and organisms by the water.
species-heterosiphonia-japonica-was-not-found-algae-2-2014-10-16-0 Algae 2 Yarmouth 2014-10-16 15:15:00 Heterosiphonia Heterosiphonia japonica I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/algae_2/photo_1.jpg sites/default/files/algae_2/photo_2_0.jpg Old Town Landing Yarmouth sites/default/files/species_photos/117_heterosiphonia.jpg sites/default/files/algae_2/photo_3_0.jpg No examples of the invasive organism were found. -We did not find any examples of invasive Algae. -We found the Bladder Wrack, or Rockweed, algae as well the Knotted Wrack algae. - Due to the similarity in characteristics, it is often difficult to differentiate between invasive and native algae. - The Knotted Wrack algae was very prevalent at the investigation scene. - Algae covered most of of the rocks and organisms by the water.
species-fucus-vesiculosus-was-found-thegs-n-2014-10-15 A TheG's n Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Rockweed Fucus vesiculosus I think I found it Native sites/default/files/a_theg039s_n/screen_shot_2014-10-16_at_1.31.25_pm.png sites/default/files/a_theg039s_n/screen_shot_2014-10-16_at_9.16.19_am.png Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/fucus_vesiculosus.jpg sites/default/files/a_theg039s_n/screen_shot_2014-10-16_at_9.19.19_am.png The Rockweed branches we continuously divided into two or something also know as dichotomously. The branches have rounded tips. I know that this isn't Knotted Wrack which looks similar to Rockweed because Knotted Wrack grows axial while like stated before Rockweed grows dichotomously. sites/default/files/a_theg039s_n/screen_shot_2014-10-16_at_9.21.21_am.png The branches were wide and flat with a line running down the middle or also known as midrib. You could feel the line when your felt it, feeling a tiny bump. I know that we didn't find Knotted Wrack because the branches may be flat but Rockweed has wider branches. sites/default/files/a_theg039s_n/screen_shot_2014-10-16_at_9.24.07_am.png We found that the branches had swollen, berry shaped pockets on some of the branches. We could also see tiny little dots on every branch and when you felt the branches you expected it to be smooth and slimy texture but instead was bumpy and slimy. We were down in Falmouth Town Landing where we think that we found the rockweed around a wet sandy, rocky area, and right near the shore line. The Algae attached themselves to the rocks and was spread farther beyond the quadrat. It looks as if it spreading extremely fast and in large amounts. Our group personally thinks that the impact is very healthy for the environment because it is a native plant.
species-botryllus-schlosseri-was-not-found-c-g5-i-2014-10-15 C G5 i Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Star tunicate Botryllus schlosseri I think I did not find it invasive sites/default/files/c_g5_i/img_0308.jpg sites/default/files/c_g5_i/img_0267_2.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/111.jpg sites/default/files/c_g5_i/img_0260_2_0.jpg We don't have any true photo evidence of star tunicate, because we did not find any. sites/default/files/c_g5_i/img_0266_2_0.jpg As demonstrated by the picture, this area was covered in seaweed. However, we found no star tunicate whatsoever within this area. sites/default/files/c_g5_i/img_0307_0.jpg We attempted to find orange tunicate in between or on the rocks, because star tunicate can often be found near this. Unfortunately, we did not find any star tunicate in the rocky area. Our study site (which was in a small tide pool) had no signs of star tunicate. It was in a rocky intertidal, and was surrounded by a paved road, people, and boats docked out on the water. We spent a significant amount of time searching for star tunicate in our study site. However, we could not find it at all. We attempted to find orange tunicate on the rocks, due to the fact that you can commonly find star tunicate near this. We did not find any sign of orange tunicate, and overall no sign of star tunicate. This is a good thing, because star tunicate is an invasive species. It is bad for the ecosystem, because it can kill the native species.
species-ascophyllum-nodosum-was-found-thegroup-n-2014-10-15 A TheGroup n Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Knotted wrack Ascophyllum nodosum I think I found it Native sites/default/files/a_thegroup_n/img_0117.jpg sites/default/files/a_thegroup_n/img_0116.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/600.jpg sites/default/files/a_thegroup_n/img_0099.jpg There was no mid rib unlike the Rock Weed sites/default/files/a_thegroup_n/img_0120.jpg It had flat stems and air bladders sites/default/files/a_thegroup_n/img_0112_2.jpg The Ascophyllum Nodosum had axial growth and was yellowish, The knotted wrack was found on a muddy beach covered with shells and rocks, rocks were slippery, the weather was overcast, there were no waves on the beach and no wind. We believe that because of the amount of the native species, the invasive species are not impacting it directly. This is because although we found seven invasive crabs, we also found two different clumps of knotted wrack. This is good for the ecosystem because knotted wrack provides homes for marine life.
species-littorina-littorea-was-found-thegroup-i-2014-10-15 A TheGroup i Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Common periwinkle Littorina littorea I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/a_thegroup_i/img_0117.jpg sites/default/files/a_thegroup_i/img_0085.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/103_0.jpg sites/default/files/a_thegroup_i/img_0114.jpg There were black bands on the tentacles. The smooth periwinkle had no bands on the tentacles so it was easy to tell which one was which. sites/default/files/a_thegroup_i/img_0115_1.jpg Smooth shell unlike the rough periwinkle. The rough periwinkle had a rough shell with noticeable ridges sites/default/files/a_thegroup_i/img_0113.jpg The shell had a shortened spike with flattened whirls. The rough periwinkle has an extended spike with more bands and stripes on the outside. It was overcast and humid outside. It was also low tide with not a lot of waves. It was muddy with shells and rocks mixed in. There were a lot of species vectors such as boats and boat docks. There were not a lot of smooth periwinkles but there were a lot of common and rough periwinkles. This means that the common periwinkles are taking up too much room for smooth periwinkles to survive in the ecosystem. The impact of the common periwinkles were very big on the other organisms in the environment.
species-hemigrapsus-sanguineus-was-found-thejellyfish-i-2014-10-15 A TheJellyfish i Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Asian shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_i/unnamed-12.jpg sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_i/img_0018_0.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/106.jpg sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_i/img_0067.jpg On the legs there are dark colored bands; these bands are unique to the Asian Shore Crab. sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_i/img_0068_0.jpg On the outside of each eye, there are three sharp spines. The spines are not rounded at all. sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_i/img_0067_0.jpg The carapace is roughly three to four centimeters wide. Four centimeters is the most common size for a full grown Asian Shore Crab. We placed the quadrat in Town Landing, the habitat there has a lot of biodiversity, including aquatic and land animals and organisms. The quadrat is right by the water. The quadrat is enveloped in seaweed and knotted wrack. In the water adjacent to the quadrat, there are many boats. Near the ecosystem there were multiple birds such as seagulls, heron, and pigeons. The weather was cloudy and foggy. We found the invasive species, the star tunicate, but it was outside of the quadrat. The area that the invasive species was in had very similar conditions as the quadrat. Because we could not find the native species, the knotted wrack, we assumed that the star tunicate and other invasive species were harmful to the environment.
species-botryllus-schlosseri-was-found-thejellyfish-i-2014-10-15 A TheJellyfish i Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Star tunicate Botryllus schlosseri I think I found it invasive sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_i/unnamed-12.jpg sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_i/img_0057_0.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/111.jpg sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_i/img_0063.jpg We measured and each zooid was about 2-4 mm long. A zooid is an individual animal that is part of the star tunicate. sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_i/img_0061.jpg The zooids are arranged in a row of about 7 organisms. This is very common as the natural number of zooids to be in a common area is 5-20. They would not be found in groups of 1 or 2. sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_i/img_0057_1.jpg The star tunicate was growing on a strip of algae that was on a wet rock. The coloring of the zooids was a yellowish green. We placed the quadrat in Town Landing, the habitat there has a lot of biodiversity, including aquatic and land animals and organisms. The quadrat is right by the water. The quadrat is enveloped in seaweed and knotted wrack. In the water adjacent to the quadrat, there are many boats. Near the ecosystem there were multiple birds such as seagulls, heron, and pigeons. The weather was cloudy and foggy. We found the invasive species, the star tunicate, but it was outside of the quadrat. The area that the invasive species was in had very similar conditions as the quadrat. Because we could not find the native species, the knotted wrack, we assumed that the star tunicate and other invasive species were harmful to the environment.
species-ascophyllum-nodosum-was-found-theroccersbunch-n-2014-10-15 A TheRoccersBunch n Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Knotted wrack Ascophyllum nodosum I think I found it Native sites/default/files/a_theroccersbunch_n/img_0106.jpg sites/default/files/a_theroccersbunch_n/img_0103.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/600.jpg sites/default/files/a_theroccersbunch_n/img_0098.jpg We found seaweed that was a yellowish-olive green. sites/default/files/a_theroccersbunch_n/img_0100.jpg It has an axial growth pattern. sites/default/files/a_theroccersbunch_n/img_0102.jpg It has air bladders. It was slightly cloudy and it rained for a short period of time while we were there. The area was covered with slightly muddy sand and there were lots of large rocks protruding from the sand. Seaweed was growing scattered all over the place. There was some bird life but not a lot. There was a lot of human activity through the area, there was a paved road leading almost into the water, a boat dock, and lots of boats in the water. We put our quadrat over a rock and on top of some muddy sand and some shells close to the water. There was seaweed covering most of the rock and a lot of the surrounding area. I think this species is impacting this environment in a positive way. It is providing habitats for crabs and is impacting the biodiversity in a positive way by increasing the biodiversity of other species and adding it's own count in biodiversity..
species-littorina-littorea-was-found-c-mjve-i-2014-10-15 C MJVE i Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Common periwinkle Littorina littorea I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/c_mjve_i/img_0025.jpg sites/default/files/c_mjve_i/img_0070.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/103_0.jpg sites/default/files/c_mjve_i/img_4966.jpg The shell apature is white. sites/default/files/c_mjve_i/img_4958.jpg Shell has a short spire, flattened whorls, and a pointed apex. sites/default/files/c_mjve_i/img_4985.jpg The shell has a smooth, thick, purplish brown shell. We were on a muddy and rocky beach with rock weed and knotted wrack strewn all over the place. The sites impact on the environment is it gives a place for invasive species, such as green and asian shore crabs.
species-littorina-littorea-was-found-b-tjgs-researchers-i-2014-10-15 B TJGS Researchers i Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Common periwinkle Littorina littorea I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/b_tjgs_researchers_i/img_4875.jpg sites/default/files/b_tjgs_researchers_i/img_4933.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/103_0.jpg sites/default/files/b_tjgs_researchers_i/img_4958.jpg One characteristic of the common periwinkle is the shell. The specimens that we identified have a smooth shell. They also had a small spire and a pointed tip. Most of the common periwinkles that we found were brown and/or purple. They ofter had whorls covering the shell. We knew that this was the common periwinkle instead of the rough periwinkle because the shell of this organism was smooth and not indented. sites/default/files/b_tjgs_researchers_i/img_4985.jpg Another identifying feature that we used to confirm our periwinkles were the black horizontal lines running along the head and tentacles of the organism. We hummed to the periwinkle; once it came out of its shell, the black lines were easy to spot. We knew that this was not the rough periwinkle because the lines were horizontal instead of vertical. sites/default/files/b_tjgs_researchers_i/img_4966.jpg The final feature that we identified on the common periwinkle is the shell aperture. The opening was white. This is another characteristic of the common periwinkle When looking for the common periwinkle, we were located on the shoreline of a rocky beach at low tide. The weather was about 21 degrees Celcius, yet cloudy. In our habitat, we found barnacles, hermit crabs, green crabs, Asian shore crabs, rock weed, knotted wrack, and the rough periwinkle along with our species. The sand in this area was made mostly up of small rocks and broken shells. Abundant amounts of seaweed covered the rocks in which the periwinkles could be found on. There were a few seagulls and some pigeons in the area. Lots of dinghies and small motor boats were docked about twenty meters out. Most of the sea life that we found was directly on the shoreline. The water temperature was 14.03 degrees Celsius with a dissolved oxygen level of 9.47 mg/L and a salinity measure of 32.12 ppt. The pH level of the water was 7.8. The common periwinkle is considered invasive because it has mostly taken the rough periwinkle's space in the ecosystem. However, the common periwinkle is not causing a lot of harm. The common periwinkle is simply taking the place of the rough periwinkle in the ecosystem as if it belongs. I wonder if it will no longer considered invasive in the near future.
species-fucus-vesiculosus-was-found-b-tjgsresearchers-n-2014-10-15 B TJGSResearchers n Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Bladder wrack Fucus vesiculosus I think I found it Native sites/default/files/b_tjgsresearchers_n/img_4921.jpg sites/default/files/b_tjgsresearchers_n/img_4927.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/fucus_vesiculosus.jpg sites/default/files/b_tjgsresearchers_n/img_4982.jpg This is bladder wrack because it grows dichotomously, dividing into two over and over. sites/default/files/b_tjgsresearchers_n/img_4942.jpg We know that this is bladder wrack because we see the midrib which is the stem-like feature of the bladder wrack. sites/default/files/b_tjgsresearchers_n/img_4931_1.jpg This is bladder wrack because because there were vesicles ( air bladders ) growing along the branches. On October 15, 2014 , our class went on a field trip to Falmouth Town Landing. We were there to investigate the affects of invasive species and to observe them. The study site we worked in was on the shore line, a rocky intertidal. It was low tide when we observed our study site. In the area there was common periwinkle, and green crab which are both invasive. We also found barnicle, hermit crab, and a large amount of rockweed on the rocks around the quadrat. We feel like the invasive species in our area did not have a strong affect against the rockweed, seeing that there was a large amount of it.
species-fucus-vesiculosus-was-found-b-scientificals-n-2014-10-15 B Scientificals n Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Rockweed Fucus vesiculosus I think I found it Native sites/default/files/b_scientificals_n/img_0090.jpg sites/default/files/b_scientificals_n/img_0090_0.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/fucus_vesiculosus.jpg sites/default/files/b_scientificals_n/img_0079.jpg This picture displays how the Rockweed has a Dichotomus pattern, or how the seaweed splits off in twos. sites/default/files/b_scientificals_n/img_0060.jpg This picture shows the swollen berry shaped recepticals at the end of the branches. It also shows also that it has 'points' on it and the color is changing to the brown or to the red when it goes to the dichotomous. sites/default/files/b_scientificals_n/img_0081.jpg This picture also shows the pairs of Vesicles lining the dichotomous branches. The climate was slightly foggy and damp, and the sun was behind some layers of stratosphere. The temperature was warm and the sand we were standing on was covered with a thick layer of black stringy seaweed. There were boats in the harbor and people on the docks next to us. Our quadrat spot was in a small beach surrounded by rocks covered with barnacles. The water had a lot of algae so there weren't any people in the water. We think that it is interesting to study the native plants because we have to know what is in our biodiversity.
species-botrylloides-violaceus-was-found-b-scientificalls-i-2014-10-15 B Scientificalls i Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Orange sheath tunicate Botrylloides violaceus I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/b_scientificalls_i/img_0057_0.jpg sites/default/files/b_scientificalls_i/img_0057.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/110.jpg sites/default/files/b_scientificalls_i/img_0097.jpg The orange sheath tunicate grows in oval shaped colonies with individual zooids. Each Zooid has a small round opening which lets in food and water. You can distinguish this species form other tunicates because it grows in chains. sites/default/files/b_scientificalls_i/img_0093.jpg The orange sheath tunicate is found covering seaweed and rocks. It typically has a glossy outer coating. The tunicate is very abstract in shape and often has multiple blobs coming off from the center. It is characterized by a uniform color (orange); the orange sheath tunicate contains a strong inner structure and grows in large clusters of zooids. sites/default/files/b_scientificalls_i/img_0082.jpg Sometimes it is difficult to distinguish the sea squirt from a colored part of a rock. We were able to discriminate between the two because the organism is thicker and more viscous. The habitat our research was preformed in was off of the docks at the end of Town Landing Rd. Falmouth, Maine. This invasive species was found in a rocky intertidal and we performed the observation while it was low tide. The air smelled of sea salt, seaweed, and vaguely of gasoline. From the shore, we could see boats, Clapboard island, water, seagulls, and buoys. On the shore, we saw the sand covered with different forms of seaweed. This includes rockweed, knotted wrack, and various different unidentified species of algae. Large rocks lined the Southern and Eastern sides of the observation sights. We were surprised when we found a rock with a similar discoloration to the organism. At first, we assumed the rock had chain sea squirt growing on it, but after further observations and the discovery of the actual substance, we realized it was just a rock. Botrylloides violaceus is hermaphroditic, meaning it has the ability to reproduce asexually and sexually. In our habitat, we found around 6 different species. Our study was originally to be conducted in a user-placed quadrat, but our species was found by just looking around. By just looking at our species, it does not seem to have an immense impact upon the seaweed it is growing upon but it seems that the species it is on is dead.
species-ascophyllum-nodosum-was-found-c-g6-n-2014-10-15 C G6 n Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Knotted wrack Ascophyllum nodosum I think I found it Native sites/default/files/c_g6_n/img_0267_3.jpg sites/default/files/c_g6_n/img_0259_3.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/600.jpg sites/default/files/c_g6_n/img_0292_2.jpg We think we found it because the stems split to two stems, this is axial growth pattern. Also, the stems are flat and not round. sites/default/files/c_g6_n/img_0284_2.jpg The plant is a greenish yellow. The air batters are an egg shape. This is also a alga. sites/default/files/c_g6_n/img_0301_2.jpg We also think that we found it because the sea weed stem was longer than the ruler. The ID card described that the stem of the knotted wrack is 60cm long. The habitat is covered by rocks, the rocks are covered by slippery seaweed and a abundance of barnacles. These rocks are by the waters edge and the rocks have many cracks that are a home for periwinkles and little crabs. This seaweed impacts the environment by hiding the small animals from predators.
species-fucus-vesiculosus-was-found-c-zem-n-2014-10-15 C ZEM n Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Rockweed Fucus vesiculosus I think I found it Native sites/default/files/c_zem_n/photo_2.jpg sites/default/files/c_zem_n/photo_4-1_1.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/fucus_vesiculosus.jpg sites/default/files/c_zem_n/img_1985.jpg We think we found rockweed because the species we found had air bubbles. sites/default/files/c_zem_n/img_1980.jpg Once we identified that the species had air bubbles we discovered that it also was flattened with a midrib on the branches of the stem. sites/default/files/c_zem_n/img_1983.jpg After we identified that the species had air bubbles and was flattened with the midrib we confirmed that it had dichotomous growth. Now that we know that this species has air bubbles, was flattened with a mid rib on the stem, and had dichotomous growth we knew we had found Fucas vesiculosus or more commonly know as; rockweed The weather at Town Landing was foggy, cloudy, kind of breezy and warm. We saw many things, crabs, shells, seaweed, periwinkles, rocks, sand, and ocean water. We set up are quadrat to the right of the dock. The air was kind of misty and humid. We were surprised not to see any birds on the beach. We saw so much seaweed. The majority of it was rockweed which I think was good because it is a native species and not causing any harm.
species-codium-fragile-was-found-c-theragers-i-2014-10-15 C TheRagers i Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Dead man's fingers Codium fragile I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/c_theragers_i/img_0306.jpg sites/default/files/c_theragers_i/img_0307_0.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/100.jpg sites/default/files/c_theragers_i/img_0312.jpg I recognize this species as Dead Man's Fingers because it matches the description on the ID card. sites/default/files/c_theragers_i/img_0313.jpg I recognized this as the Dead Man's Fingers because of its thick/ round stem. It is also distinguishable from other species because it is longer and somewhat more gangly than other species. sites/default/files/c_theragers_i/screen_shot_2014-10-17_at_12.35.02_pm.png One more feature that is partially distinguishable is that it grows dichotomously. Although it isn't to be confused with the rock weed, which also grows dichotomously. The difference between them is that the Rock Weed has a flattened stem whereas the "DMF" has a rounded stem. Inside of the quadrat site, we found very slippery rocks covered by rock weed and knotted wrack. This is because it was low tide. The rocks had large crevices and holes where we found the invasive green crab. We found around 5 green crabs and other kinds of snails and periwinkles. The day was mostly cloudy with small appearances by the sun and there were occasional blue skies. In my opinion, I don't think that this species is very harmful yet. This is because it took our group very long to find the species and it didn't look like it was affecting the biodiversity. I also think that the species can be extracted from the environment if we try hard enough.
species-fucus-vesiculosus-was-found-c-theragers-i-2014-10-15 C TheRagers i Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Rockweed Fucus vesiculosus I think I found it Native sites/default/files/c_theragers_i/img_0306.jpg sites/default/files/c_theragers_i/img_0307_1.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/fucus_vesiculosus.jpg sites/default/files/c_theragers_i/img_0310.jpg We found rockweed. We know it was rockweed and not knotted wrack because the rockweed grows dichotomously, so the branches divide two over and two over. Knotted wrack has axial growth, so the branches come off of one long stem. sites/default/files/c_theragers_i/img_0314.jpg Rockweed has little heart-shaped receptacles on the ends of the branches, while knotted wrack have singular receptacles that sites/default/files/c_theragers_i/img_0311.jpg Rockweed is olive green and sometimes yellow green, while knotted wrack is brownish and yellow. This picture shows both, the rockweed is the darker one. Inside of the quadrat site, we found very slippery rocks covered by rock weed and knotted wrack. This is because it was low tide. The rocks had large crevices and holes where we found the invasive green crab. We found around 5 green crabs and other kinds of snails and periwinkles. The day was mostly cloudy with small appearances by the sun and there were occasional blue skies. In my opinion, I don't think that this species is very harmful yet. This is because it took our group very long to find the species and it didn't look like it was affecting the biodiversity. I also think that the species can be extracted from the environment if we try hard enough.
species-ascophyllum-nodosum-was-found-c-mjve-n-2014-10-15 C MJVE n Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Knotted kelp Ascophyllum nodosum I think I found it Native sites/default/files/c_mjve_n/img_0071_0.jpg sites/default/files/c_mjve_n/img_0069.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/600.jpg sites/default/files/c_mjve_n/img_0067.jpg We know that we found the species Knotted Wrack because there were randomly placed air bladders that were placed along the branches and the stem. sites/default/files/c_mjve_n/img_0072.jpg The whole plant was yellowish in color and grew in the axial growth pattern with flattened branches and stems. sites/default/files/c_mjve_n/img_0061.jpg The seaweed we found was not Rockweed because the color was a yellowish color instead of green and instead of growing in a dichotomous growth pattern it grew in an axial growth pattern. At Town landing, we were on the right side of the beach and parking lot our study site was at a bunch of big rocks covered in rockweed and Knotted Wrack with a small amount of other species. The habitat was very wet and it had a lot of rocks and seaweed. There were a lot of barnacles, crabs and Common Periwinkle, but there were not a lot of mussels. Our species that we are publishing about is Knotted Wrack. Knotted Wrack has a huge impact on the Maine ecosystem because it provides hiding places for many things including the invasive Green Crab and the invasive Asian Shore Crab. It also oxygenates the water using photosynthesis and it provides food for some animals.
species-ascophyllum-nodosum-was-found-d-anonymous-n-2014-10-15 D Anonymous n Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Knotted wrack Ascophyllum nodosum I think I found it Native sites/default/files/d_anonymous_n/img_0093.jpg sites/default/files/d_anonymous_n/img_0072.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/600.jpg sites/default/files/d_anonymous_n/img_0130.jpg The plant has axil growth which means that it grows randomly from the main stem. It also has a flattened stem. sites/default/files/d_anonymous_n/img_0115.jpg There are egg shaped air bladders along the rubbery branches. sites/default/files/d_anonymous_n/img_0110.jpg The kelp is olive green-brown. Our quadrat site had a little pool with rocks around it and seaweed on top of them. It was about sixty degrees fahrenheit and cloudy outside. Some of the species we found were snails, knotted wrack, rock weed, crabs, barnacles and a hermit crab. There are seagulls that hang out around the shore lines, and pigeons often perch on the nearby docks as well. The quadrat was on the shoreline and it would be underwater during high tide. People disturb the area by walking along the beach and swimming in the water there. Our species, the Knotted Wrack provides shelter for many species including the many types of crabs that we found in our quadrat study.
species-carcinus-maenas-was-found-thejellyfish-n-2014-10-15 A TheJellyfish n Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Green crab Carcinus maenas I think I found it Invasive sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_n/img_0023.jpg sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_n/img_0019_0.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/107.jpg sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_n/img_0024.jpg This crab has 5 spines after each eye, which is a characteristic of the green crab. sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_n/img_0068.jpg The crab on the bottom is a green crab while the crab on the top is an asian shore crab. You can see in this picture how the shape of the shell is a pentagon which is a distinguishing feature of the green crab. sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_n/img_0026.jpg There are sharp tips on each one of of the crab's claws. This is a trait of the green crab. We are in a rocky intertidal habitat with six different species in our quadrat. Our quadrat is located near a boat launch which could be a vector for invasive species. We found lots of native seaweeds but three invasive crabs within our quadrat, however we found no native crabs which is an indication that green crabs are harming the ecosystem.
species-ascophyllum-nodosum-was-not-found-thejellyfish-n-2014-10-15 A TheJellyfish n Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 Knotted wrack Ascophyllum nodosum I think I did not find it Native sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_n/img_0023.jpg sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_n/img_0023_1.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/600.jpg sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_n/img_0005.jpg The species of has rubbery branches with egg shaped paired vesicles which Knotted Wrack doesn't have. sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_n/img_0005_0.jpg The seaweed we found has a midrib which Knotted Wrack does not have. sites/default/files/a_thejellyfish_n/img_0019.jpg The coloration of the seaweed we found was different than that of the Knotted Wrack. Knotted Wrack is more of an olive-yellow than what we found. We are in a rocky intertidal habitat with six different species in our quadrat. Our quadrat is located near a boat launch which could be a vector for invasive species. We found lots of native seaweeds but three invasive crabs within our quadrat, however we found no native crabs which is an indication that green crabs are harming the ecosystem.
species-diadumene-lineata-was-not-found-thegs-i-2014-10-15 A TheG's i Falmouth 2014-10-15 14:00:00 orange-striped anemone Diadumene lineata I think I did not find it Invasive sites/default/files/a_theg039s_i/img_0123.jpg sites/default/files/a_theg039s_i/img_0083.jpg Falmouth Town Landing sites/default/files/species_photos/orange-striped_anenome.jpg sites/default/files/a_theg039s_i/img_0111.jpg We had the correct habitat for finding the orange-striped anemone but it was not found even when we scoured the area. Last year the orange-striped anemone was found in the same place but is not there anymore. We went down to the Falmouth town landing the other day to look for Rock crabs, Jonah crabs, Green crabs and Asian shore crabs. It was a cloudy day. We stopped on some rocks to place our quadrat and start our search. The rocks were covered in algae because of the low tide (rock weed and knotted wrack). There was mud in between the rocks. We lifted some rocks in search of the anemone but is was not found. This is a good thing because something is happening to drive away the invasive species.