Invasive SpeciesAsian bittersweet

Celastrus orbiculatus
FOUND by LEA Teach
2010-06-02
Bridgton
ID Confirmed
Quality checked by Mary J
Peer reviewed by
Field Notes
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
The leaves are toothed and alternate.
Photo of my evidence.
The vine of the plant climbs and wraps around other species.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Celastrus orbiculatus
Common name:
Asian bittersweet
Count of individuals: 
1-10
Coverage: 
Less than 1/4 covered
Reproduction: 
Sampling method: 
Quadrat (randomized- placement)
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 44.047660 °
Longitude: 
W -70.708480 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Upland - Forest
Trip Information
Name:
Pondicherry
Trip date: 
Wed, 2010-06-02 13:05
Town or city: 
Bridgton
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Upland
Watershed: 
Sebago Lake
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
Evidence of vectors: 
Walking trail
People
Stone walls
Tree canopy cover: 
Between 1/2 and 3/4
Soil moisture: 
Moist

Comments

Sprouts (young plants) have "morphology" that is inconsistent. This means that the leaf of a young plant can look very different than a plant of an older plant of the same species. So it is tricky to say this is the invasive Celastrus orbiculatus when the native Celastrus scandens looks very similar. We would need to wait a couple of years to see the fruits confirm its species. That being said, I think you will find you are correct knowing the difference in occurrence/abundance, there are a lot more of the invasive species around, the native are more rare. Good photos