Invasive SpeciesJapanese knotweed

Fallopia japonica
NOT FOUND by mstafford
2010-07-12
Winslow
ID Confirmed
Quality checked by mstafford
Peer reviewed by kjurdak
Field Notes
It is a beautiful summer day and we are excited about Vital Signs. In addition we have research assistants with us _ ages 2 and 5. We hear traffic and birds.
A sketch of our study site.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
The leaves of fallopia are alternate, simple, oval, and smooth. We found alternate and simple, but palmate and toothed with 3 - 5 lobes.
Photo of my evidence.
The stem on fallopia has swollen joints and is reddish in color. Larger stems are hollow. The plant we found had a thin and viney stem with tendrils.
Photo of my evidence.
There were several plants in the quadrat, but no thick bushes of any height.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I did not find it
Scientific name:
Fallopia japonica
Common name:
Japanese knotweed
Sampling method: 
Quadrat (user-placement)
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 44.551050 °
Longitude: 
W -69.624610 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Upland - Developed areas
Trip Information
Name:
Town Office Park
Trip date: 
Mon, 2010-07-12 09:30
Town or city: 
Winslow
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Upland
Watershed: 
Lower Kennebec
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
6 different species
Evidence of vectors: 
Walking trail
People
Construction
Birds
Tree canopy cover: 
Soil moisture: 
Moist

Comments

Thank you for providing solid evidence statements and photographs! The way that you compared the traits of Fallopia to the traits of the plant in your quadrat made your case quite clearly. Glad to hear that you are including some budding researchers in your Vital Signs work. I noticed that you included some natural potential vectors in the area, good thinking! I wonder which of the vectors you mention is most likely to help an invasive plant gain entry to Town Office Park.