Invasive SpeciesVariable watermilfoil

Myriophyllum heterophyllum
NOT FOUND by The Rainbow Che...
2011-10-18
Augusta
ID Confirmed
Quality checked by Jocelyn
Peer reviewed by
Field Notes
The weather is nice and we get to work near and in the water. The pond thing is really smelly. We see the pond, plants, algae floating along the surface, and we saw the other groups rushing around. We are surprised that we found such large clumps of algae. The problem was that the was pond was quite murky, therefore we couldn't see the bottom or the plant life submerged.
A sketch of our study site.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
There is no steam, and Variable watermilfoil has a thick reddish brown steam.
Photo of my evidence.
There is no leaves. The milfoil has feather like leaves that are whorled.
Photo of my evidence.
The stuff we found was clumped together and milfoil grows in individual branches.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I did not find it
Scientific name:
Myriophyllum heterophyllum
Common name:
Variable watermilfoil
Sampling method: 
Weed weasel
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 44.312390 °
Longitude: 
W -69.748280 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Freshwater - In a developed area
Trip Information
Name:
Cony Wetlands by football field and across by the culvert
Trip date: 
Tue, 2011-10-18 09:45
Town or city: 
Augusta
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Freshwater
Watershed: 
Upper Kennebec
MIDAS Code: 
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
Evidence of vectors: 
Water temperature: 
pH: 
Dissolved oxygen: 

Comments

You're right, this specimen is not variableleaf water milfoil. It's not even a vascular plant. What your picture shows is a type of filimentous algae which is made up of microscopic plants that live in shallow water near shore or on submerged objects. For more information I suggest visiting the University of Maine's Field Guide to Aquatic Phenomona at: http://www.umaine.edu/waterresearch/FieldGuide/default.htm and checking out the "Stuff in the Water" tab.
Thanks for looking.