Native SpeciesAquatic worm

Oligochaetae (order)
FOUND by LPD
2011-06-03
Saco
ID Questioned
Quality checked by roses
Peer reviewed by
Field Notes
We found a large diversity of macroinvertebrate. We did find some mayflys and some aquatic worms and some damesl flys. We heard a lot of cars because long pond was right next to a road. There were many trees and plants. We found a lot of native species. The pond is man made.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
look at the color the aquatic worm has the same greenish color according to the id cards
Photo of my evidence.
look how it swims in an s shape. the worm always swims in an s shape.
and it is the right size- the aquatic worm should be 2-10 mm and this one was approximately 10 mm, as you can tell by comparing it to the size of the bug box it is inside. The bug box magnifyer is 3.5 cm long in total.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Oligochaetae (order)
Common name:
Aquatic worm
Count of individuals: 
Coverage: 
Reproduction: 
How big is it?: 
0 - 2 cm
Is it male or female?: 
Can't tell
Sampling method: 
Just looking around
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 43.476690 °
Longitude: 
W -70.386860 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Freshwater - By water's edge
Trip Information
Name:
Long Pond
Trip date: 
Fri, 2011-06-03 11:43
Town or city: 
Saco
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Freshwater
Watershed: 
Saco
MIDAS Code: 
5622
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
10 different species
Evidence of vectors: 
Paved road
Walking trail
People
Construction
Water temperature: 
20.1°C
pH: 
7.2
Dissolved oxygen: 
6.0mg/L

Comments

There are lots of macroinvertebrate ID keys out there, and you will find nematodes on most of them because they are so abundant. Nematodes are the most numerous multicellular animals on earth, do some research on them. In your second picture you can see that the organism has Cephalic setae, which wouldn't be there if it were an aquatic worm.

ID

It looks like a nematode.

We need proof that it is a nematode or don't question us!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It's great and totally appropriate that you're asking for more evidence, BUT scientists typically communicate with one another and challenge one another in a professional and respectful way. Maybe next time try something like this: "We gave 3 reasons why we think it is X. Can you please give us 3 reasons why you think it is Y?" Then you can hash it out from there, get to an answer, and all be smarter for it!