Native SpeciesWhite pine

Pinus strobus
FOUND by 6SA1
2010-12-16
E. Waterboro
ID Confirmed
Quality checked by pparent
Peer reviewed by 6BP19
Field Notes
Biodiversity Study Felid Notes: It is about eight in the morning on October 19th. My science class and I are trying to find out how many different plants are on the Massabesic Middle School campus (Biodiversity). Each group was assigned a five by five meter quadrat. We were each told to pick different plants and take pictures of characteristics that could determine its species. I chose a plant that I think is similar to a Pine Tree. It looks to be a young plant though. So when I looked up the card on Vital Signs you could not see the characteristics the same as if it were a fully grown tree. Outside I hear, see and smell certain things. There are people all around me in my, and their own quadrats. My groups quadrat is placed near the road in a small ditch. There are many other plants in it than just mine. It’s latitude is 43.58158 degrees and the longitude is -70.70087. It’s very busy out here. Because it is early in the morning it is very cold. About 1.8 degrees Celsius. The wind speed is 0mph. The humidity is 80%. Last but not least the soil temperature is 10.3 degrees Celsius. The sun has not come up that high yet. Plus there’re clouds covering the sky. Therefore, the light intensity is not very high. The habitat that the plant I have chosen in is the edge in a road in a ditch. My plant is sitting on top of a small mound covered in ferns. There are more little plants around it that may be poison ivy. Other dead leaves and branches from the tree about surround the plant. Now I am going to tell you specifically about my plant. I am writing this to confirm that this is a White Pine. Maine is known of the Pine tree State, that gives me confidence that this plant is a White Pine. This plant seems to be a sapling, about sixty centimeters tall. A full grown White Pine will be as tall as 30 meters. Since mine is not full grown I cannot use that as assurance that my plant is a White Pine. This sapling has needles that look just like the Vital Signs White Pine Card describes. The needles are finely tooth and seven centimeters long, fitting the 5-13 centimeter description. That can be used as evidence that my sapling is a White Pine. A feature that a full grown white Pine has is Pine Cones in the Spring. Sense my pant is a sapling it has not established Pine Cones yet. Second of all, it is Fall/ Winter time now so the Pine Cones would not be on the tree at this time of year anyway. The most important and efficient way to tell Pine Tree’s apart is the number of needles there are in a single cluster. I used the the booklet on the Forest Trees on Maine and it said that Eastern White Pine have clusters of five needles. My sapling has clusters of five. In another book about forests in Maine I read that the bark of a young White Pine is smooth and a red-brown or just brown in some spots. That describes the color of my sapling exactly. When we went outside the second time, in December, we were in in the middle of learning about transpiration. We used my plant for the following experiment. My class and I wanted to see if transpiration happened in the winter as well as in the summer. So, we but a clear plastic glove over a branch of my sapling. That was on December second. The next week, December ninth, we went and checked to see if any transpiration had collected in the glove. It had! But it was not in a liquid form, it was ice. Little balls of ice had collected in the bottom of the fingers of the glove. They were very small, but we proved that transpiration does take place in the winter. Some plants that my classmates picked were under the ice/ water. I was lucky enough to have the soil under my plant be very cold with ice over it, but not yet frozen.
A sketch of our study site.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
The most important and efficient way to tell Pine Tree’s apart is the number of needles there are in a single cluster. I used the the booklet on the Forest Trees on Maine and it said that Eastern White Pine have clusters of five needles. My sapling has clusters of five. The most important and efficient way to tell Pine Tree’s apart is the number of needles there are in a single cluster.
Photo of my evidence.
In another book about forests in Maine I read that the bark of a young White Pine is smooth and a red-brown or just brown in some spots. That describes the color of my sapling exactly.
Photo of my evidence.
The needles are finely tooth and seven centimeters long, fitting the five- thirteen centimeter description on the White Pine Card from Vital Signs.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Pinus strobus
Common name:
White pine
Count of individuals: 
1-10
Coverage: 
Less than 1/4 covered
Reproduction: 
Sampling method: 
Quadrat (user-placement)
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 43.582803 °
Longitude: 
W -70.699114 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Upland - Developed areas
Trip Information
Name:
MMS Quadrat Study
Trip date: 
Thu, 2010-12-16 04:20
Town or city: 
E. Waterboro
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Upland
Watershed: 
Saco
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
20 different species
Evidence of vectors: 
Paved road
Walking trail
People
Tree canopy cover: 
Open to 1/4 covered
Soil moisture: 
Moist

Comments

We went out again yesterday and our quadrat had changed again. It was still quite wet, but not as wet as a few weeks ago. Since the last visit, the needles on my plant have gotten a lot more brown. I don't know for sure why the needles have turned a brown color. Other than that, my plant has not changed that much. It hasn't gotten any taller, but shows no signs of wilting.

When we went outside to see how our quadrats had changed, they were very wet. My plant specifically had not changed very much. Since it is a Pine Tree it does not loose it's needles during the winter. My plant is perennial. Along with he needles still being there, they have gotten bushier. There are more of them all around the plant.

Thank you (: I worked hard and so did my other classmates

the research you did is great

My guess for the transpiration experiment in the spring would be that the tree would transpire more. I predict that because on a sunny day evaporation occurs more so why wouldn't transpiration occur more as well? I will offer to my teacher to repeat the experiment this spring and let you know after the experiment is completed.

You have collected some great evidence in this observation and done a very nice job using the digital camera. I am impressed by your photos, you must have been practicing. Good idea to look in another resource (you mention a book about Maine forests) to learn how the bark of a young white pine tree looks. You mention that you found that your tree was transpiring in the winter, do you think your experiment would go any differently in the spring? Would you expect the tree to transpire more, less, or the same amount on a warm, sunny day than it did in the winter?

Terrific Field notes! I feel like I was there with you. I really like how you incorporated one investigation into another. I would have loved to see photos of your transpiration investigation.

Wow, very elaborate field notes. You really told the whole story of your time spent in the quadrat. Nice, clear pictures. Though your submission has not been confirmed yet, I think you got it right. Your written evidence one of the 5 needles per cluster is a great way to id white pine and maybe a picture of an isolated cluster of 5 would of made it easier for an expert to confirm your id. Overall, great job and outstanding details.

No we haven't found out how much a tree transpires a day. But that would be a great experiment to try and I will recommend it to my teacher.

You made some excellent, clear observations of the habitat and species. You used your eyes and identification resources nicely together.

Your transpiration experiment and results sound really interesting! In your research have your stumbled across just how much water a tree transpires in a day?

You must have worked really hard on it