Native SpeciesBalsam fir

Abies balsamea
FOUND by Jrobish
2017-04-28
Machias
Not Yet Reviewed by Expert
Quality checked by Jenny
Peer reviewed by Pam
Field Notes
I am happy because it is not too hot out (49º) Smells like Christmas trees, multiple dead trees with no needles. No evidence of white pine. We set up a line that was 15 meters long and our transect was perpendicular to this line at the 5 meter mark. It was 6 meters long and we identified all the species 1/2 a meter on either side of our transect. We found an abundance of Balsam Fir (11 trees), 0 Hemlock, 0 white pine and 0 Red Pine.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
There were two white racing stripes on the underside of the needles.
Photo of my evidence.
This is a picture of a younger and older bark on the trees. The bark of the older tree is brown, rough, and scaly.
Photo of my evidence.
The leaves and stems crushed up smell like a Christmas tree. There were no evident cones on the trees, however, we did find cones on the ground at the base of the trees. Picture shown.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Abies balsamea
Common name:
Balsam fir
Count of individuals: 
10-20
Coverage: 
Reproduction: 
Sampling method: 
Transect
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 44.707068 °
Longitude: 
W -67.454087 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Upland - Forest
Trip Information
Name:
UMM Outback Trail
Trip date: 
Fri, 2017-04-28 13:48
Town or city: 
Machias
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Upland
Watershed: 
Eastern Coastal
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
1 different species
Evidence of vectors: 
Walking trail
Tree canopy cover: 
Between 1/2 and 3/4
Soil moisture: 
Moist

Comments

Great photo comparing the bark of younger and older trees.

Nice work including a ruler for scale! That seems like a lot of fir trees. I wonder if that is common for the region where you are. Would be cool to repeat the sampling at some other sites and see.

Thanks for sharing!

~sniffly