Invasive SpeciesGreen crab

Carcinus maenas
FOUND by LNF
2017-10-24
Cape Elizabeth
Not Yet Reviewed by Expert
Quality checked by Ms Fanning
Peer reviewed by Carolina Crustations
Field Notes
Everybody could smell the strong salty smell of the Atlantic ocean. It was October 24, 2017, when the class went to Kettle Cove. It was around 9 AM on a crisp Tuesday. It was a very chilly 62 degrees Fahrenheit due to the strong wind gusts. It definitely did not feel like 62 degrees. The air felt thick because of the mist and the ocean breeze. It was loud because of all the waves and the loud noise of people talking. As soon as they released the students a lot of them immediately went to the rocks and started scoping out the area and places where they could find the Green Crab. As lots of people stepped on the rocks they realized it was very slippery. They had to make sure they stayed stable so they wouldn’t slip. When the students went it was ebb tide. We had finally found the Green Crab after looking for a while. The Green Crab moved around a lot, so it was hard to take pictures of it. After picture taking it was released back into it’s natural habitat. Overall the students had a great time at Kettle Cove.
A sketch of our study site.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
This is a Green Crab because in this picture you can see that it is about 10 cm wide. I know this because the circle part of the clipboard we used was about 10 cm size and they are typically 10 cm stated on Vital Signs. That is why I know this is not another species.
Photo of my evidence.
This is a Green Crab because in this picture you can see the sharp, thin legs that Green Crabs have. I know this because Green Crabs have long and thin legs stated on Vital Signs. That is why it's a Green Crab and not a Rock crab.
Photo of my evidence.
This is a Green Crab because in this picture you can see the green on the claws and legs. I know this because Green Crabs have green on the claws and legs. That is why I know this is Green Crab and not Rock Crab.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Carcinus maenas
Common name:
Green crab
Sampling method: 
Just looking around
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 43.561100 °
Longitude: 
W -70.217500 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Coastal - Rocky intertidal
Trip Information
Name:
Kettle Cove Moniz 2017
Trip date: 
Tue, 2017-10-24 09:30
Town or city: 
Cape Elizabeth
Type of investigation: 
Species Survey
Ecosystem: 
Coastal
Watershed: 
Presumpscot
Time of low tide: 
Fri, 2014-10-24 08:26
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