Invasive SpeciesBurning bush

Euonymus alatus
FOUND by FunkyMonkeys
2015-10-15
South Portland
ID Confirmed
Quality checked by AquaBacon
Peer reviewed by
Field Notes
I am happy because it is sunny and we get to go outside, not stuck in the classroom. It is an average, chilly, sunny, October morning in Maine and about 45 degrees Fahrenheit. Questions we ran into were, What kind of plant is this? When do the berries start to grow? When do the leaves change from green to pink? When do the leaves fall off? We see a park across the street, other kids looking at plants, cars, a stream, trees, other plants, and leaves. We hear cars, a stream, leaves blowing in the wind, children complaining that it is cold, and kids playing in the park across the street. We smell gas from cars, a stream, and trees. I am surprised that only a couple weeks after we went out for the first time there were completely no more leaves on the plant. We think we found the Burning Bush.
A sketch of our study site.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
We think we found the Burning Bush. We think we found the Burning Bush because the vital signs booklet says to look for a plant up to 2.5 meters tall. Our plant was 1.5 meters tall, so it fits these requirements. The vital signs booklet also says that the Burning Bush is normally wider than it is tall. Our plant is 1.77 meters wide, which is wider than the height of this plant. The last thing that the vital signs booklet says about our plant is that it lives for three or more years. We talked to our teacher about this and she said that this is the third year she has been studying this plant. This means this plant may not be here next year. Our teacher will be keeping this in mind, when she goes to do this project next year. We think we found the Burning Bush because everything the vital signs booklet says about the Burning Bush applies to our plant.
Photo of my evidence.
We think we found the Burning Bush. We think we found the Burning Bush because the vital signs booklet says to look for a plant up to 2.5 meters tall. Our plant was 1.5 meters tall, so it fits these requirements. The vital signs booklet also says that the Burning Bush is normally wider than it is tall. Our plant is 1.77 meters wide, which is wider than the height of this plant. The last thing that the vital signs booklet says about our plant is that it lives for three or more years. We talked to our teacher about this and she said that this is the third year she has been studying this plant. This means this plant may not be here next year. Our teacher will be keeping this in mind, when she goes to do this project next year. We think we found the Burning Bush because everything the vital signs booklet says about the Burning Bush applies to our plant.
Photo of my evidence.
We think we found the Burning Bush, because the vital signs booklet tells us there are bright red leaves in the beginning of fall. We went out in the beginning of fall, and our leaves were bright red-ish. It also tells us that flowers start blooming in late April to June, and the flowers have yellow-greenish petals. From late September to early October there are little red berries starting to grow. In early November, after the berries start to come out, the leaves start to fall off, until the bush is completely bare. We went out again in November, and all the leaves had fallen off. We think we found the Burning Bush because the seasonal changes of this plant and the seasonal changes of the Burning Bush in the vital signs booklet are the same. We think we found the Burning Bush. Our stem is brown on the outside and a little green in the inside exactly like the vital signs booklet says the Burning Bush has. The vital signs booklet says the Burning Bush has 2-4 wing-like shapes on all of the stems. Our plant has wings coming off the stem like the vital signs booklet said. Most of the stem's parts are pointy. On the vital signs booklet of the Burning Bush it says look for multiple stems, and our plant has multiple stems, like the vital signs booklet said. This is why we think we found the Burning Bush.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Euonymus alatus
Common name:
Burning bush
Sampling method: 
Quadrat (user-placement)
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
We’re sorry, JavaScript is required to view the map. If JavaScript is you may wish to upgrade to a newer browser in order to view this map.
Map this species
Latitude: 
N 43.634375 °
Longitude: 
W -70.250751 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Upland - Developed areas
Trip Information
Name:
Trout Brook
Trip date: 
Thu, 2015-10-15 08:00
Town or city: 
South Portland
Type of investigation: 
Species Survey
Ecosystem: 
Upland
Watershed: 
Fore River to Casco Bay Watershed

Comments

Great job with your identification! I really enjoyed reading through your field notes and very descriptive supporting evidence. It was neat that you were able to observe this plant more than once and watch it change over time!