Invasive SpeciesJapanese knotweed

Fallopia japonica
FOUND by emilydubois
2013-10-29
Biddeford
ID Confirmed
Quality checked by cassidy g
Peer reviewed by kristen m
Field Notes
While we were outside we could hear the cars driving down the street, we could see all the knotweed in the corner of the field. We also saw lots and lost of fallen over and dead brush on the ground around the bamboo like structures. we could see smell the fresh air. What surprised us about what we found was that we found and saw so much about the Japanese knotweed. That plant is very damaging. So in a couple of years are more if could damage our school a lot.
A sketch of our study site.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
this is a picture of Japanese knotweed. If you look closely you can see the alternating leaves.
Photo of my evidence.
As you can see in this picture Japanese knotweed leaves are very big. There are no hair on the underside of it. They have smooth edges. The leaves also end at a point.
Photo of my evidence.
The stems are hallow and have joints on it that resemble bamboo.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Fallopia japonica
Common name:
Japanese knotweed
Count of individuals: 
Coverage: 
Reproduction: 
Sampling method: 
Just looking around
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 43.493247 °
Longitude: 
W -70.470836 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Upland - Field
Trip Information
Name:
Biddeford High School
Trip date: 
Tue, 2013-10-29 11:57
Town or city: 
Biddeford
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Upland
Watershed: 
Saco
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
Evidence of vectors: 
Tree canopy cover: 
Soil moisture: 
Moist

Comments

I give you the gold star for best, most detailed observation that I've seen this week! (and I've looked a fair few, from Biddeford and other places).

I'm giving you this virtual gold star for these reasons (call it my evidence!):
* you looked for hairs on the undersides of the leaves and clearly reported what you saw/didn't see
* you included a ruler in your leaf picture, and an iPad, for scale
* your sketch is beautiful and appropriately detailed - you captured just what you saw
* you started thinking about what finding F. japonica on your school grounds could mean in the future

The only thing I'd suggest for next time (and I hope there is a next time!) would be to capture and share a picture of the whole site, the whole plant. It's great to get the details captured, but the overall look of the plant and site can tell an important story.

great work.

gbh