Invasive SpeciesDasysiphonia

Dasysiphonia japonica
FOUND by silly unicorns
2014-10-28
Cape Elizabeth
ID Questioned
Quality checked by Kris M
Peer reviewed by Space adventure squad
Field Notes
Field Notes: When I got to the beach, the first thing that hit me was the overwhelming stench of rotten eggs. I was immediately excited because that stench was similar to the the smell of Asian red algae, which I know because it was written on the informational ID card for Asian red algae from Vital Signs. I took a moment to take in my surroundings. The air was nippy and breezy, but not enough for me to put on a jacket. Average temperature for October. I took a guess and decided that it was about forty eight degrees Fahrenheit.You could hear a faint sound of seagulls in the distance, accompanied by the general din of my classmates chattering and the waves lapping gently on the shore. Above me, I could see light gray storm clouds forming, and it looked like it was about to rain. The atmosphere was bright enough to hurt your eyes if you looked at the clouds but the clouds cast a large shadow dimming our surroundings. At the entrance of of the beach, there were bamboo-like plants. Some had already changed color, and were a muted mshade of brown. Some were even starting to die.The tide was low, and there waves were barely there at all. There were some small streams leading into the ocean. Some rocks and boulders were poking out of the sand. But all of those features were masked by the enormous mats of red and brown that covered everything. Literally. Everything. I was nearly certain that I had found Heterosiphonia because the species looked identical to the pictures and descriptions on the I.D sheet. When I finally got my samples and prepared to take my pictures, I ran into a small problem. Tangled within my seaweed was small pieces of other seaweed species, which ruined the clarity of our picture. The process of taking out other pieces was long and tedious. Even when I got most of it out there were still some small pieces ensnared in the strands of my species. I was amazed and surprised by how widely Asian Red Algae went along the beach and how spread it has gotten it was a great example of how invasive species affect the environment.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
One of the most important characteristics of Heterosiphonia is that it's main branches are multiple cells thick, while it's side branches are only one cell thick. I think I have found my species because, as you can see from this picture, especially on the right side, the most prominent branch of my specimen has multiple cells in it's configuration, while the side branches have only one three dimensional cell. This species is not sea lettuce, another species that I found on the beach that I went to, because the cells of that species are round and very tightly packed in one large mass, whereas these cells are rectangular and are spaced into strings.
Photo of my evidence.
Perhaps the simplest trait of Heterosiphonia is it's color. It is mostly a rust color, with hints, of red, brown, auburn, and pink. I think that my subject is Asian red algae because it matches the description exactly. It is a reddish brown with hints of pink. My species is not, however dead man's fingers, another common seaweed, because they are a mossy green, whereas the only hint of green in this picture is from a little bit of another species that could not be pried out of this sample's fronds.
Photo of my evidence.
One of the most important characteristics of Heterosiphonia is that it's main branches are multiple cells thick, while it's side branches are only one cell thick. I think I have found my species because, as you can see from this picture, especially on the right side, the most prominent branch of my specimen has multiple cells in it's configuration, while the side branches have only one three dimensional cell. This species is not sea lettuce, another species that I found on the beach that I went to, because the cells of that species are round and very tightly packed in one large mass, whereas these cells are rectangular and are spaced into strings.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Dasysiphonia japonica
Common name:
Dasysiphonia
Sampling method: 
Just looking around
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
We’re sorry, JavaScript is required to view the map. If JavaScript is you may wish to upgrade to a newer browser in order to view this map.
Map this species
Latitude: 
N 43.563268 °
Longitude: 
W -70.219769 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Coastal - Beach or dune
Trip Information
Name:
Kettle Cove Cape Elizabeth
Trip date: 
Tue, 2014-10-28 09:08
Town or city: 
Cape Elizabeth
Type of investigation: 
Species Survey
Ecosystem: 
Coastal
Watershed: 
Presumpscot
Time of low tide: 
Tue, 2014-10-28 08:25

Comments

I don't see really good evidence for monosiphonous side branches in these micrographs.

I really loved reading your wonderfully descriptive field notes which painted a beautiful picture of your surroundings during your field work. I found your written descriptions very helpful as well. I am not the species expert for heterosiphonia, but I look forward to hearing what they have to say about your find. Thanks for posting!

Cheers and happy observing,
-MB