Native SpeciesDamselfly larva

Odonata (order)
FOUND by gmsmole
2017-10-02
Gorham
ID Confirmed
Quality checked by Claudia
Peer reviewed by Hannah
Field Notes
We could see ducks and we were surrounded by trees and poison ivy, we could also hear the birds chirping and the people talking and we were surprised about all of the poison ivy. There was oil in the water, so that was a problem, and there was trash in the water but other than that it was very relaxing.
A sketch of our study site.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
In this picture, we know that it is a damselfly because it can extend its jaw, and we know that because of the evidence provided below too.
In this picture, this damselfly larva has three tails.
Photo of my evidence.
In this blurry picture, this damselfly larva has six legs.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Odonata (order)
Common name:
Damselfly larva
Count of individuals: 
Coverage: 
Between 1/4 and 1/2
Reproduction: 
Eggs (animals)
How big is it?: 
0 - 2 cm
Is it male or female?: 
Can't tell
Sampling method: 
Net
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 43.664265 °
Longitude: 
W -70.445033 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Freshwater - In a pond or lake
Trip Information
Name:
Ram Pond GMS
Trip date: 
Mon, 2017-10-02 08:54
Town or city: 
Gorham
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Freshwater
Watershed: 
Presumpscot
MIDAS Code: 
6942
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
20 different species
Evidence of vectors: 
Walking trail
Water temperature: 
21.0°C
pH: 
7.0
Dissolved oxygen: 
7.5mg/L

Comments

file:///Users/claudia.peterson/Desktop/IMG_1713.JPG This picture is of an adult damsel fly. It has all the similarities to the baby damsel fly, other than the color and size.

Good job with the ID. Photos of the feathery gills would help as well as the mouthparts.

Nicely done on identifying the damselfly larvae.