Native SpeciesWood frog

Rana sylvatica
FOUND by 34SYellowTeam
2015-04-13
Wells Maine
ID Questioned
Quality checked by 34SYellowTeam
Peer reviewed by 34SYellowTeam
Field Notes
I saw a wood frog. I see tadpoles.I hear a frog. I smell the water. I also hear a type of bug. the water level went down.
A sketch of our study site.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
Wood frog tadpoles are small, dark and numerous.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Rana sylvatica
Common name:
Wood frog
Count of individuals: 
Coverage: 
Reproduction: 
How big is it?: 
Is it male or female?: 
Sampling method: 
Just looking around
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 43.319690 °
Longitude: 
W -70.594593 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Freshwater - On a wetland
Trip Information
Name:
WES Vernal Pool 2015
Trip date: 
Mon, 2015-04-13 16:24
Town or city: 
Wells Maine
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Freshwater
Watershed: 
Piscataqua
MIDAS Code: 
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
Evidence of vectors: 
Water temperature: 
pH: 
Dissolved oxygen: 

Comments

boom goes the dinamite

boom goes the dinamite

sorry but it is salamander tadpoles

its awesome i love the photos

The ID of the observed larvae is uncertain, but I'm not sure there is enough evidence to confirm the identification of the species found. I can change the status to questioned, but want the group to know that this is a particularly difficult task and takes expert knowledge to know what clues to look for to correctly identify the species. The more information you collect and observe in the field, the better!

It is really hard to tell when amphibian larvae are so small without closer inspection, but there is a good chance that the larvae are baby spotted salamanders. The evidence I would use to support this is the fact that the one egg that hasn't hatched yet is greenish in color. There is a special alga that grows on spotted salamander eggs turning them green.

Hi Bill,

I notice that you say you thik these might be spotted salamanders but the team is making the claim that this is wood frog. Should this be "ID confirmed" or "ID questioned"?

Thanks for all your great feedback!
-VS Team

Love the sketch of the frog nice going!

I like how your photos went good with your words.