Native SpeciesEastern hemlock

Tsuga canadensis
FOUND by ka13nhs14
2017-04-28
Machias
ID Questioned
Quality checked by KAB
Peer reviewed by
Field Notes
At UMM we went to the outback trail. We did a transect line tree count. It was misty but nice to be outside.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
The bark is brownish and scaly.
Photo of my evidence.
The needles do droop and are a lot shorter than the fir needles. They are attached with a small stem.
Photo of my evidence.
The two that I found were dead but we compared them to a live one we saw in another spot.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Tsuga canadensis
Common name:
Eastern hemlock
Count of individuals: 
1-10
Coverage: 
Reproduction: 
Sampling method: 
Transect
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 44.707341 °
Longitude: 
W -67.455303 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Upland - Forest
Trip Information
Name:
UMM outback trail
Trip date: 
Fri, 2017-04-28 13:00
Town or city: 
Machias
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Upland
Watershed: 
Eastern Coastal
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
6 different species
Evidence of vectors: 
Walking trail
People
Tree canopy cover: 
Between 1/2 and 3/4
Soil moisture: 
Moist

Comments

We counted 2 trees that I thought were hemlocks. The two were dead but we observed a live hemlock that had similar bark to the dead ones.

Short-needled conifers can be tricky--especially when they are dead and have no needles--and bark characteristics in particular can be confusing. Some bark just screams the identity of the tree--especially after you've spent some time identifying trees. The photos provided scream "spruce". The scaliness of the bark is one give-away in the photos; color and overall texture also support the identification. .

Bark and needles typical of spruce. Without additional details and images would not narrow down to species.

Without a closeup it might be hard for the expert to confirm or question this. I tried to zoom in using your second evidence photo, but it doesn't look like hemlock, I don't think.

You said you did a tree count. How many trees did you count?

~sniffly

We counted 2 trees that I thought were hemlocks. The two were dead but we observed a live hemlock that had similar bark to the dead ones.